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We have a class which translates user interface into several languages. Basic idea of this class is that it simply checks all controls on the form and read text values for each control from an xml file.

foreach(Control control in form.Controls)
{
    if (control is Label)
        ReadTextForLabel(control);
    else if (control is MySuperCoolLabel)
        ReadTextForMySuperCoolLabel(control);
    ...
}

So we tried to create a universal class for translating every control in our programs.

Some time ago we came to a problem that we have too many classes like MySuperCoolLabel from different libraries. If we want to translate interface in a new program using our translation class, we have to add all these dlls with our SuperCoolLabels even if there are no any SuperCoolLabels in the program.

The question is: how to avoid all these dependencies and still have one universal class to translate programs?

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1  
At the point where you assign text to a label (or a SuperCoolLabel or whatever) most people would assign the localized text from a resource dictionary. Why do you want to iterate through all the controls after they've been initialized? –  Tim Rogers Mar 30 '12 at 9:59

4 Answers 4

Maybe you can try to distinguish controls not by type, but typenames as strings. something like;

if (control.GetType().ToString() == "Label")
    ReadTextForLabel(control);
else if (control.GetType().ToString() == "MySuperCoolLabel")
    ReadTextForMySuperCoolLabel(control);

On the other hand, I wonder why you did not use .Net builtin support for multi language.

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For historical reasons. But your idea is good, it might work out. –  Ask Mar 30 '12 at 10:55
    
No, it won't. Methods like ReadTextForMySuperCoolLabel still have external references inside –  Ask Mar 30 '12 at 11:08
1  
why it has external references? –  daryal Mar 30 '12 at 11:18
    
But if you have no MySuperCoolLabels ReadTextForMySuperCoolLabel is never called, not JITted and so its external references are not loaded. –  Mark Hurd Mar 30 '12 at 14:15

Well, dependencies are metter of the program architecture. To be clear:

I suppose you write ReadTextForMySuperCoolLabel(..) cause you need to translate some particular to that control properties, that you will not possibly met into other controls you use.

If this is true, there is no way to avoid the dependecy yuo're talking about. Use you direct assignment, use reflection, use somethig else... there have to be someone, somewhere that says: "this is a MySuperControl, so do this, this is other, so do that".

If there is a way generalize the property assignment. For example, all controls in your app could have Text property. In this case could make the stuff general.

Good luck.

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Your assumption is correct. Different controls requires different actions on our side. Some of them have only Text properties, some others have 4 more different things to be translated –  Ask Mar 30 '12 at 10:26
    
@Ask: I'm afraid you have no other option then treat them separately. As I said: there have to be someone, somewhere who sperates those controls. You can try to generalize (if it's not already done). I mean all common properties between all controls setup in one place. But if it make a code too complex, just leave t as is. Readability and clearness of the code is absolute paramaunt. –  Tigran Mar 30 '12 at 10:32

Well, one way would be to late bind all your classes, either by using a dependency injection framwork (like Castle Windsor) or rolling your own by creating your classes like this :

var myCoolClass = Activator.CreateInstance(  typeof( MySuperCoolTextBox ) )

That way you won't need to add a reference to the SuperCool library, only include it with your binries. However, I am guessing that SuperCool controls are used in a form designer, so you might not be able to instatiate your controls like this.

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Your problem is actually a violation of Liskovs Substitution Principle since your translation class must handle each derived type separately.

We know that winforms have to types of controls: Containers and Controls. A container contains several controls while a control is just a control ;)

We can use that knowlegde to create a universal form translator:

public class UniversalFormTranslater
{
    public void TranslateForm(System.Windows.Forms.ContainerControl container)
    {
        var name = container.Name;
        var originalText = container.Text;
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(originalText))
            container.Text = Translate(name);

        TranslateControl(name, container);
    }

    private void TranslateControl(string parentName, System.Windows.Forms.ContainerControl control)
    {
        var name = parentName + "." + control.Name;
        var originalText = control.Text;
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(originalText))
            control.Text = Translate(name);
    }

    private void TranslateControl(string parentName, System.Windows.Forms.ContainerControl container)
    {
        var name = parentName + "." + container.Name;
        var originalText = container.Text;
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(originalText))
            container.Text = Translate(name);

        foreach (var control in container.Controls)
        {
            TranslateControl(name, control);
        }
    }

    public void Translate(string controlName)
    {
        // return the translation.
    }
}

It looks for strings like:

  • Form1.MyGroupPanel.Label1
  • Form1.MyTextBox

Translate by using:

var translator = new UniversalFormTranslater();
translator.TranslateForm(form1);
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