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I'm just in the process of reorganizing the layout of my version control for open source project that I run, no one is using the project at the moment so I thought that I would get in and organize the layout a bit better so that it is a bit easier to maintain and use if people want to use it.

I have been doing some reading about different layouts but haven't really found anything that deals with projects that have tests. I have come up with two different layouts that I think might work but I just can't decided which one would be better.

alt text

The lib folder in each project folder contains the compiled binaries that the project needs to compile. So the ProjectA.Examples.Lib folder would contain the latest stable compiled version of ProjectA.

Which layout do you think would be better?

The advantage I see 2) over 1) is that the test are included with ProjectA so that you can't pull down ProjectA without the tests, and if you branch or tag the tests go with it.

EDIT I have edited the picture to show what I intended in the first place. Thanks @Esko Luontola for pointing that out.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since the tests should be versioned along with the code they run against, (2) makes more sense imo. Keeping them together in the same hierarchy reduces the possibility of staleness issues and raises any conflicts earlier in the development cycle.


Note: The OP has clarified that the tests directory should indeed be under trunk.

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The source code and tests should be always together, both under trunk. So the repository layout in SVN would be like this:

  • ProjectA
    • branches
    • tags
    • trunk
      • src
      • test
      • lib
  • ProjectA-Examples
    • branches
    • tags
    • trunk
      • src
      • lib

Another possibility would be to store the examples together with the main codebase. If the examples are small and you redistribute the examples together with the main codebase, this would make more sense.

  • ProjectA
    • branches
    • tags
    • trunk
      • src
      • test
      • lib
      • examples

On the other hand, if the examples are moderate-sized example applications, then each example might be best as its own project.

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Opps my bad, test were supposed to be in trunk but I stuffed up the image. –  Nathan W Jun 15 '09 at 1:05

You might try something like:

  • Project
    • ProjectA
      • tags
      • branches
      • trunk
        • lib
        • doc
        • src
        • tests
        • samples

This organization keeps an entire project, including its tests and samples (which are in fact part of the project as a whole), within a single versioned tree in source control.

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I was going to do that but the samples may contain large files for the demos and I don't want to have to check them out every time I need to edit the source code of ProjectA –  Nathan W Jun 15 '09 at 0:57
    
Then you may think about creating a more complex directory structure for your project, within /Project/ProjectA/trunk/. However, I would recommend ensuring, any time you make a change, that all samples compile and all tests on the samples pass - and it would be easiest to accomplish this with by checking out the whole tree. –  yfeldblum Jun 15 '09 at 1:47

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