Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having an issue with an application that uses a in-memory dictionaries (instantiated via new Constructor(bla, fla, pla)). As soon as resident memory size approaches ~100-150 Mbs the mark-compact phase takes more than a second. Each hundred megs adds one more second.

The behavior can be reproduced by running the following:

node --trace_gc test-memory.js

test_memory.js:

var http      = require('http'),
    Construct = function () {
        this.theField = Math.random();
    },
    storage   = [];

http.createServer(function (req, res) {
    var i = 100000;

    while (--i) {
        storage.push(new Construct());
    }

    res.end('Lots of data generated.');
}).listen(1337, '127.0.0.1');

Then do curl localhost:1337 for some time and watch this:

Scavenge 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 2 ms.
Mark-sweep 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 943 ms.
Mark-compact 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 1306 ms.
Scavenge 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 2 ms.
Mark-sweep 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 937 ms.
Mark-compact 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 1189 ms.
Scavenge 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 2 ms.
Mark-sweep 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 935 ms.
Mark-compact 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 1191 ms.
Scavenge 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 1 ms.
Mark-sweep 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 1015 ms.
Mark-compact 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 1218 ms.
Scavenge 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 2 ms.
Mark-sweep 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 937 ms.
Mark-compact 143.5 -> 143.5 MB, 1195 ms.

As far as I can tell the GC tries to move around objects that are not going to be freed anyway.

The only solution I found is to move these objects into a Buffer, but for my application that would mean an overhead of JSON.stringify|JSON.parse which most likely will end up in more CPU time. Plus that will require quite a rewrite.

I understand that it may be more of a v8 problem, but may be there is some way to circumvent the GC for objects that are not going to be released?

node.js version is 0.6.11

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Have you tried to compare performance with using REDIS or Membase? As far I can see, you reach the level where this can be considered an in-memory database, so you can try to compare to actually using one these.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't, but it will not be viable in my case. The point is, if I cache immutable data I can write my application like this (i.e. synchronously): user.item = storage.get('Item', itemId) Using any kind of external storage will make me use the async approach. Also, I have found a leak in my app so the problem is somewhat mitigated. –  Prologus Aug 30 '12 at 13:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.