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Destructors are weird. I was attempting to eliminate the need of using the disposable pattern by using 'smart' reference management, ensuring that the garbage collector could collect objects at the correct time. In one of my destructors I had to wait for an event from another object, which I noticed it didn't. The application simply shut down and the destructor was terminated in middle of execution. I'd expect a destructor is always allowed to finish running, but as the following test indicates that is not true.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading;


namespace DestructorTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main( string[] args )
        {
            new DestructorTest();
            new LoopDestructorTest();
            using ( new DisposableTest() ) { }
        }
    }

    class DestructorTest
    {
        ~DestructorTest()
        {
            // This isn't allowed to finish.
            Thread.Sleep( 10000 );
        }       
    }

    class LoopDestructorTest
    {
        ~LoopDestructorTest()
        {           
            int cur = 0;
            for ( int i = 0; i < int.MaxValue; ++i )
            {
                cur = i;
            }
            // This isn't allowed to finish.
            Debug.WriteLine( cur );
        }
    }

    class DisposableTest : IDisposable
    {
        public void Dispose()
        {
            // This of course, is allowed to finish.
            Thread.Sleep( 10000 );
        }
    }
}

So, aren't destructors guaranteed to finish running?

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3  
Waiting for an event from another object within a finalizer? This is madness! –  MattDavey Mar 30 '12 at 11:06
    
You really should stick with the IDisposable pattern to have reliable destruction and resource release. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 30 '12 at 11:07
    
@MattDavey ... and waiting for an event from another object to continue triggering Dispose() isn't madness? What's the difference? –  Steven Jeuris Mar 30 '12 at 11:08
    
1  
link Read the second bullet under The Finalize method might not run to completion or might not run at all in the following exceptional circumstances: –  Tung Mar 30 '12 at 11:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

So, aren't destructors guaranteed to finish running?

No. From what I remember, when the process terminates it gives finalizers a couple of seconds to execute, but then terminates the process abruptly. You wouldn't want a bad finalizer to prevent a process from ever finishing, would you?

You should regard finalization as a "best effort" clean-up - in particular, it's not going to happen in situations where the whole system is abruptly shut down, such as BSOD or power outage.

EDIT: I've found some pseudo-documentation in the form of a blog post from Joe Duffy:

If a lock was orphaned in the process of stopping all running threads, then, the shutdown code path will fail to acquire the lock. If these acquisitions are done with non-timeout (or long timeout) acquires, a hang will ensue. To cope with this (and any other sort of hang that might happen), the CLR annoints a watchdog thread to keep an eye on the finalizer thread. Although configurable, by default the CLR will let finalizers run for 2 seconds before becoming impatient; if this timeout is exceeded, the finalizer thread is stopped, and shutdown continues without draining the rest of the finalizer queue.

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Actually I would, or at least I would like to get a big massive warning in Visual Studio the application didn't finalize correctly (as in not all destructors were allowed to finish running). –  Steven Jeuris Mar 30 '12 at 11:06
6  
@StevenJeuris: It sounds like you're relying on finalizers in a situation where you really shouldn't. Finalizers should help to avoid resource leaks - if your system will end up in a bad state if they don't run to completion, you should redesign. After all, there's always the possibility that they won't run due to a BSOD, power outage etc. –  Jon Skeet Mar 30 '12 at 11:08
    
Well the redesign of course involves using IDisposable, which isn't terminated abruptly because it has to wait x ms for an event which indicates a disposal step is finished and the next step can be executed. I just don't see the point of destructors then. In what situation should you rely on them? –  Steven Jeuris Mar 30 '12 at 11:27
1  
@StevenJeuris: Rely on them to always execute, for correctness in persistent state outside your process? Never, as far as I'm concerned. You should always consider that it's possible for your system to simply stop executing. You can rely on them to clean-up resources which don't need to be eagerly released, within a process. Personally I can't remember the last time I wrote a finalizer... –  Jon Skeet Mar 30 '12 at 11:32
    
A system failure isn't of any concern to me, neither is persistency. I was just attempting to clean up unmanaged memory without having to worry when (e.g. using or calling Dispose()). Your answer makes clear why that always has to happen through IDisposable. It also makes clear that even though calling Dispose() in the destructor is what the pattern advices, it's only a meager last resort. I didn't want to 'eagerly' release those unmanaged resources, I just wanted to release them when the GC wanted to. Thank you for the explanation! I'll no longer use them either. –  Steven Jeuris Mar 30 '12 at 11:47

So, aren't destructors guaranteed to finish running?

Although its not in your code there can be instances where a GC.SuppressFinalize is explicitly called from Dispose() method. This supresses the finalization, and is for objects that does not require it.

This can improve performance significantly, as finalizable objects will always survive one garbage collection, i.e. it will be promoted to a gen1 or even a gen2 GC, which has a greater cost associated with it.

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.NET doesn't come with destructors. Your code contains finalizers instead.

Finalizers are called when the object is garbage collected, not when it is nullified. They also get limited execution time to prevent hanging objects.

See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finalizer.

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1  
But C# definitely does have destructors –  Henk Holterman Mar 30 '12 at 11:41
    
The people who wrote the C# spec have decreed that the syntactical element indicated with a tilde followed by a class name is officially called a destructor. I happen to think the destructor syntax and terminology are both silly, since (1) the term "destructor" was already used by other languages, to mean something different and unrelated; (2) the term "finalizer" exists and describes what the C# destructor is generally trying to do, though a destructor wraps a finalizer in some other code; (3) proper use of a destructor generally requires GC.SuppressFinalize() and GC.KeepAlive().... –  supercat Apr 29 '12 at 0:33
    
...so unless there exist frameworks which support the latter two functions but perform finalization via some method other than overriding Object.Finalize, use of a destructor is no more portable than would be overriding Object.Finalize, if C# permitted the latter course of action. –  supercat Apr 29 '12 at 0:34

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