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I need to convert a string to 7-bit ASCII with even parity in a C# application which communicates with a mainframe. I tried using Encoding.ASCII, however, it does not have the correct parity.

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4  
What have you tried? –  Oded Mar 30 '12 at 11:14
    
i have tried using utf32 utf7,utf8,encoding and default but not working basically want a "," character to be converted to ox82 –  ankush Mar 30 '12 at 11:16
    
Those are all Unicode encodings. You can try the ASCII encoding, though it is 8bit. –  Oded Mar 30 '12 at 11:16
    
What would you want to happen to non-ASCII strings? –  Jon Skeet Mar 30 '12 at 11:17
    
i want to pass it to mainframe system which accept only7-bit ASCII with even parity. –  ankush Mar 30 '12 at 11:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Perhaps something like this:

public static byte[] StringTo7bitAsciiEvenParity(string text)
{
    byte[] bytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(text);

    for(int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
    {
        if(((((bytes[i] * 0x0101010101010101UL) & 0x8040201008040201UL) % 0x1FF) & 1) == 0)
        {
            bytes[i] &= 0x7F;
        }
        else
        {
            bytes[i] |= 0x80;
        }
    }
    return bytes;
}

Completely untested. Don't ask me how the magic to compute parity works. I just found it here. But some variant of this should do what you want.

I tried to make this work for the case ',' becoming 0x82. But I can't work out how that is supposed to be done. ',' is, in ASCII, binary 00101100 and 0x82 is binary 10000010. I don't see the correlation at all.

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, should become 10101100b or 0xAC. –  user7116 Mar 30 '12 at 13:17
    
@sixlettervariables Good, that was what I got as well. The rest seems to match with the parity table you linked to as well. By the way, I think your way of not clearing the top bit on non-7bit ASCII data is probably better than what I did. –  Henrik Ripa Mar 30 '12 at 14:27
    
I think the default for Encoding.ASCII will throw an exception in the case where it is non-ASCII data. –  user7116 Mar 30 '12 at 15:45

You will have to calculate the parity bit yourself. So:

  1. convert string into byte array using built in 8bit ASCII encoding. Most top bit should allways be 0 using this encoding.
  2. do the bit modifications on each byte and set parity bit for each byte.

There is no built-in functionality for calculating parity bit, that I know of.

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A bit twiddling trick can help. –  user7116 Mar 30 '12 at 11:52

Assuming byte-level parity and no-endian related behavior (i.e. a stream of bytes), the following works as intended (tested against a known 7-bit ASCII even parity table):

public static byte[] GetAsciiBytesEvenParity(this string text)
{
    byte[] bytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(text);

    for(int ii = 0; ii < bytes.Length; ii++)
    {
        // parity test adapted from: 
        // http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#ParityParallel
        if (((0x6996 >> ((bytes[ii] ^ (bytes[ii] >> 4)) & 0xf)) & 1) != 0)
        {
            bytes[ii] |= 0x80;
        }
    }

    return bytes;
}
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