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I need to build a project programmatically for a .csproj I am creating on the fly. While searching Google I found the classes and API provided by the MS for the MSBuild Engine. With that information, I create a process which executes msbuild.exe and then reads the output, but now I want to use the namespace Microsoft.Build.Execution to build the project. This is my program:

public class Compiler
{
   private static string locationOfMSBuilldEXE = "";
   public static void Build(string msbuildFileName)
   {
       BuildManager manager = BuildManager.DefaultBuildManager;

       ProjectInstance projectInstance = new ProjectInstance(msbuildFileName);
       var result = manager.Build(new BuildParameters() 
                {
                    DetailedSummary = true
                }, 
                new BuildRequestData(projectInstance, new string[] { "Build" }));
       var buildResult = result.ResultsByTarget["Build"];
       var buildResultItems = buildResult.Items;

       string s = "";
   }
}

The results show that this is building fine, but I need to know the detailed output from the compile and how to view it. It would be really helpful if someone can give me link to a good tutorial or a book on MSBuild.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to add a instance of a class that implements the ILogger interface to your BuildParameters. You can add a new instance of one of the supplied loggers in the Microsft.Build.Logging namespace, or you can implement ILogger yourself as it is very small and there is a helper class in the Microsoft.Build.Utilities namespace called Logger that is easy to extend.

Build loggers

ILogger interface

Logger helper

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thankx.. can you also tell my where to find a good tutorial for the same set of namespaces? –  Parv Sharma Mar 30 '12 at 12:12
    
@Parv - Other than the documentation (which I think is excellent), you can try this one amazon.com/Inside-Microsoft%C2%AE-Build-Engine-Pro-Developer/dp/… –  Ritch Melton Mar 30 '12 at 12:16
    
There are only two books devoted to MSBuild that I'm aware of, and both are good (and reviewed by the developers): (1) The MSPress book mentioned above -- but the link is to the first edition, get the second edition, which includes 4.0 features; (2) MSBuild tips and tricks - search on Amazon - this is very much an advanced guide. The MSDN documentation is quite limited, I'm afraid. –  cheerless bog Apr 1 '12 at 19:52
    
@cheerless - I've had good results with the documentation with creating custom tasks, hooking the build process, etc... –  Ritch Melton Apr 1 '12 at 20:22

thanks @ritch melton.. though i figured it out myself. heres my code. i have used an inbuilt logger ConsoleLogger

public class Compiler
    {
        private static string locationOfMSBuilldEXE = "";
        public static void Build(string msbuildFileName)
        {
            ConsoleLogger logger = new ConsoleLogger(LoggerVerbosity.Normal);
            BuildManager manager = BuildManager.DefaultBuildManager;

            ProjectInstance projectInstance = new ProjectInstance(msbuildFileName);
            var result = manager.Build(
                new BuildParameters() 
                {
                    DetailedSummary = true,
                    Loggers = new List<ILogger>(){logger}
                }, 
                new BuildRequestData(projectInstance, new string[] { "Build" }));
            var buildResult = result.ResultsByTarget["Build"];
            var buildResultItems = buildResult.Items;

            string s = "";
        }
    }
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If you just want to build a project or solution, without elaborate parameters, you can do it more simply. Pseudocode:

using namespace Microsoft.Build.Evaluation;

...
var p = Project.Load("path to project");
p.Build(...);

That's it! BuildParameters and so forth are for quite advanced scenarios. Visual Studio itself uses them.

Dan (msbuild dev)

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A good alternative is using Project Templates.

Here is how to do it: Visual Studio Extensibility, Programmatically Creating A Project

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Hi! Welcome to Stack Overflow. We usually discourage answers that leave most of the content in links, because they aren't permanent and often break over time. Could you include a summary or relevant description from the link in your answer? Thanks! –  Hyper Anthony Aug 13 '13 at 17:38

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