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I have a situation where I need to watch the tests, gather information, and then build a report from the tests. The tests will be started via TeamCity. I create a TestWatcher object to listen for test results, and this TestWatcher is included in each JUnit class that contains tests. I had a listener which would listen to when the entire suite is completed, but I had to add that programmatically. Since I am now using TeamCity to run the tests and generate results, I believe I have lost that capability. I have been asked to also produce a PDF report with the TeamCity results. All I need to know is when the tests are finished so I can know when to start building my report. Is there anyway to accomplish this by just using a TestWatcher?

Below is what my TestWatcher looks like at the moment. BaseTestResult is just a class that contains results of the tests, and organizes them in order to print them out easier. I am also using Selenium, and the driver variable is of type WebDriver. :

@Rule
    public TestWatcher watchman = new TestWatcher() {
        private BaseTestResult currentTest;
        private long startTime;
        private long endTime;

        @Override
        protected void starting(Description d) {
            startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
            currentTest = new BaseTestResult(d);
            currentTest.setBrowser(type);
            if (d.getAnnotation(TestDescription.class) != null) {
                currentTest.setDescription(d.getAnnotation(
                        TestDescription.class).description());
            }
            currentTest.setSuite(d.getTestClass().getName());
        }

        @Override
        protected void succeeded(Description d) {
            currentTest.setSucceeded(true);
        }

        @Override
        protected void failed(Throwable e, Description d) {
            currentTest.setThrowable(e);
        }

        @Override
        protected void finished(Description d) {
            endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
            currentTest.setRuntime(endTime - startTime);
            String fileName = d.getMethodName() + type + ".png";
            File srcFile = ((TakesScreenshot) driver)
                    .getScreenshotAs(OutputType.FILE);
            String filePath = "./screens/" + fileName;
            try {
                FileUtils.copyFile(srcFile, new File(filePath));
                currentTest.setScreenshotPath(filePath);
            } catch (IOException e) {
                log.severe(e.toString());
            }

            if (currentTest.getSucceeded()) {
                BaseListener.getSuiteResult().addPassed(currentTest);
            } else {
                BaseListener.getSuiteResult().addFailed(currentTest);
            }

            // Quit, the web driver
            if (driver != null) {
                driver.quit();
            }
        }

    };
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do this:

@ClassRule // the magic is done here
public static TestRule classWatchman = new TestWatcher() {
    @Override
    protected void starting(Description desc) {
        System.out.println(desc.testCount()); // insert actual logic here
    }
};

This watches whole class instead of every test. That means that it gives you the number of tests in a suite on the start of the suite. Then, every time you call BaseListener.getSuiteResult().addPassed(currentTest); or BaseListener.getSuiteResult().addFailed(currentTest); you can check whether you have already added the number of tests in a suite (meaning the suite is done).

Or, even better,

@ClassRule
public static TestRule classWatchman = new TestWatcher() {
    @Override
    protected void finished(Description desc) {
        System.out.println("Suite completed!"); // insert actual logic here
    }
};

If you have multiple classes containing tests, you can create a single AllMyTests class containing all of those! This AllMyTests class can be then run by JUnit. In this case, @ClassRule will behave as a @SuiteRule (which doesn't exist).

@RunWith(Suite.class)
@Suite.SuiteClasses({ First.class, Second.class, Third.class })
public class AllMyTests {
    // nothing to do
}
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1  
btw I just realized that we both use our Test Watcher named in the old way "Watchman" :) –  Slanec Mar 30 '12 at 13:49
    
Thanks for the answer, this is definitely a step in the right direction. What if I have multiple classes? I am planning on having more than one test class, and would like to build a report from the results of all test classes that run. –  Reid Mac Mar 30 '12 at 13:53
    
Gonna edit the answer in a minute to answer your comment. –  Slanec Mar 30 '12 at 13:57

This worked for me

@ClassRule 
public Static TestWatcher watchman= new TestWatcher() {
  @Override
  protected void failed(Throwable e, Description description) {


  logger.info(description.getMethodName()+"Failed!"+" "+e.getMessage());
  }

  @Override
  protected void succeeded(Description description) {

    logger.info(description.getMethodName()+" " + "success!");
  }
  @Override
  protected void finished(Description desc) {
  logger.info("Suite completed!");
  }
};
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