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Given a vector of N elements v = ( 1, 2, 3, 4, ... , N ) return range iterator over all chunks of size K<N. The last range can be smaller than K if N%K!=0.

For example:

v = ("a","b","c","d","e")

display strings

"ab", "cd", "e"

N=v.size();
K=2;

One possible solution is:

for( unsigned int i=0; i<v.size(); i+=K )
    cout << boost::join( v | boost::adaptors::sliced( i, min(i+K, v.size()) ), "" );

This solution is quite ok but it has several problems:

  1. for loop - is it needed?
  2. if you write i+K instead of min(i+K, v.size()) algorithm crushes, one needs to pay additional attention to boundary case. This looks ugly and distracts.

Can you propose more elegant solution? By elegant solution I mean the use of a general algorithm, build in or provided by commonly used library (such as boost).

-------------------------- [edit] --------------------------

Some of you wonted working example, here it is.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <boost/range/adaptor/sliced.hpp>
#include <boost/algorithm/string/join.hpp>
#include <boost/assign.hpp> //just for fun

using namespace std;
using namespace boost::assign;

int main(int , char **)
{
    const int K = 2;
    vector< string > v;
    v += "a","b","c","d","e";

    for( unsigned int i=0; i<v.size(); i+=K )
        cout << boost::algorithm::join( 
                    v | boost::adaptors::sliced( i, min(i+K, v.size()) ), "" ) 
             << endl;
}

Output:

ab 
cd
e
share|improve this question
    
why don't you post full example? –  BЈовић Mar 30 '12 at 12:35
1  
@VJovic in the example I showed what I really need but this is more general question, how to run an algorithm on every chunk of a container separately. –  bartek Mar 30 '12 at 12:46
    
Unfortunately, I can not compile your example, and I lost my crystal ball ;) –  BЈовић Mar 30 '12 at 13:12
1  
@BЈовић C'mon, it is perfectly obvious what he wants to achieve even without any compilable example. Compilable examples are nice, but we shouldn't stop thinking. Can you really answer his question better after you compiled his code yourself and saw the same output as he has given? –  Christian Rau Jul 10 '12 at 7:33

3 Answers 3

WRT "For loop is it needed?"

A loop construct is needed if one wants to avoid using std::distance() as one needs to track how much is left. (For random access containers, std::distance() is cheap --but for all others it is too costly for this algorithm.)

WRT i+K / min() issue

Don't write i+K or anything that could cause wrapping/over/underflow issues. Instead track how much is left and subtract. This will require using min().

WRT elegant solution

This algorithm is more "elegant" in that:

  1. The first two "WRT" items above are not issues.
  2. It does not use any external libraries; --it only makes use of std::copy_n() and std::advance().
  3. It exploits argument-dependent lookup if that is needed/desired.
  4. It uses the container's size_type.
  5. It will work efficiently with any container.
  6. If K <= 0 then std::domain_error is thrown.

The solution is C++11 although it can be easily converted to C++98 if one also writes copy_n().

#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>
#include <algorithm>

template <
  typename Container,
  typename OutIter,
  typename ChunkSepFunctor
>
OutIter chunker(
  Container const& c, 
  typename Container::size_type const& k,
  OutIter o,
  ChunkSepFunctor sep
)
{
  using namespace std;

  if (k <= 0)
    throw domain_error("chunker() requires k > 0");

  auto chunkBeg = begin(c);
  for (auto left=c.size(); left != 0; )
  {
    auto const skip = min(left,k);

    o = copy_n(chunkBeg, skip, o);

    left -= skip;
    advance(chunkBeg, skip);

    if (left != 0)
      sep();
  }
  return o; 
}

int main()
{
  using namespace std;

  using VECTOR = vector<string>;
  VECTOR v{"a","b","c","d","e"};

  for (VECTOR::size_type k = 1; k < 7; ++k)
  {
    cout << "k = " << k << "..." << endl;
    chunker(
      v, k, 
      ostream_iterator<VECTOR::value_type>(cout),
      []() { cout << endl; }
    );
  }
  cout << endl;
}

EDIT: It would be better to write chunker() so that the sep functor received the output iterator and returned an output iterator. This way any updates between outputting chunks concerning the output iterator could be correctly handled and the generic routine far more flexible. (For example, this would allow the functor to remember the end position of each chunk; the functor to copy out chunks, empty the container, and reset the output iterator; etc.) If this is undesired, then like the Standard Library one could have more than one overload with different sep requirements, or, eliminating the argument altogether. This updated chunker() looks like this:

template <
  typename Container,
  typename OutIter,
  typename ChunkSepFunctor
>
OutIter chunker(
  Container const& c, 
  typename Container::size_type const& k,
  OutIter o,
  ChunkSepFunctor sep
)
{
  using namespace std;

  if (k <= 0)
    throw domain_error("chunker() requires k > 0");

  auto chunkBeg = begin(c);
  for (auto left=c.size(); left != 0; )
  {
    auto const skip = min(left,k);

    o = copy_n(chunkBeg, skip, o);

    advance(chunkBeg, skip);
    left -= skip;

    if (left != 0)
      o = sep(o);
  }
  return o; 
}

and the call to chunk would be the less pretty but generally more useful (although not in this case):

chunker(
  v, k, 
  ostream_iterator<VECTOR::value_type>(cout),
  [](ostream_iterator<VECTOR::value_type> o) { cout << endl; return o; }
);

This has turned out to be a surprisingly elegant little routine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Paul for your answer. Making use of std::copy_n() and std::advance() is another simple and elegant option. I like the chunker signature and whole algorithm generality. –  bartek Jul 12 '12 at 11:00

This is a sort-of-generic solution with good performance:

template <class T, class Func>
void do_chunks(T container, size_t K, Func func) {
    size_t size = container.size();
    size_t i = 0;

    // do we have more than one chunk?
    if (size > K) {
        // handle all but the last chunk
        for (; i < size - K; i += K) {
            func(container, i, i + K);
        }
    }

    // if we still have a part of a chunk left, handle it
    if (i % K) {
        func(container, i, i + i % K);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
can I do it using general algorithms? –  bartek Mar 30 '12 at 12:47
2  
@bartek: I think the point here is that this becomes a general algorithm that you can use throughout your code instead of repeating the same logic. –  Vaughn Cato Mar 30 '12 at 12:50
    
@VaughnCato when writing such algorithm one can make more mistakes than just forget about min function in adaptors::sliced. That's why I asked for a solution that uses just generic algorithms as in my example. –  bartek Mar 30 '12 at 13:06
    
@bartek: Generic algorithms are nice - at least, they should be. Sadly C++'s generic algorithms are rather... lacking IMO. –  orlp Mar 30 '12 at 13:08
    
@bartek: true, but once you have unit-tested the do_chunks function, you never have to worry about that again. –  Vaughn Cato Mar 30 '12 at 13:11

I don't know if it's very elegant, but you can use iterators with standard functions advance and distance :

template<typename Iterator, typename Func, typename Distance>
void chunks(Iterator begin, Iterator end, Distance k ,Func f){
    Iterator chunk_begin;
    Iterator chunk_end;
    chunk_end = chunk_begin = begin;

    do{
        if(std::distance(chunk_end, end) < k)
            chunk_end = end;
        else
            std::advance(chunk_end, k);
        f(chunk_begin,chunk_end);
        chunk_begin = chunk_end;
    }while(std::distance(chunk_begin,end) > 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using std::advance and std::distance, good example. Still, the if(std::distance(chunk_end, end) > k) part is quite distracting. My solutions is shorter but yours does not use external library. –  bartek Mar 30 '12 at 13:58
    
Shouldn't the line if(std::distance(chunk_end, end) > k) actually be < k? This logic seems to cause the whole vector to be processed as only one big chunk. –  PBJ Jul 17 '12 at 23:09
    
@David Yes you're right ! –  Ubiquité Jul 18 '12 at 7:23

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