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I would like to allow only one country access, but exclude proxies within this country.

This is what I have (shortened version for convenience)

<Limit GET POST>
order deny,allow
deny from all
allow from 139.82.0.0/16
allow from 143.54.0.0/16
allow from 186.192.0.0/11
allow from 186.224.0.0/11
.
deny from 186.201.27.66
deny from 186.201.196.1
deny from 186.214.51.231
deny from 186.237.225.26
</Limit>

But I know this wont work. How do I go about doing this?

share|improve this question
    
of course, but in this case the (proxy) last deny group IPs are WITHIN the allowed IPs, which will be processed last. –  Gaia Mar 30 '12 at 16:05
    
Just use order allow,deny instead. –  Gerben Mar 31 '12 at 18:27
    
Like this? order allow,deny allow from 139.82.0.0/16 allow from 143.54.0.0/16 allow from 186.192.0.0/11 allow from 186.224.0.0/11 . . . deny from 186.201.27.66 deny from 186.201.196.1 deny from 186.214.51.231 deny from 186.237.225.26 deny from all since deny is processed last, wouldnt deny from all invalidate all the allows? –  Gaia Apr 2 '12 at 18:01
    
I missed the deny from all. You'll need to remove that line entirely. To quote apache's docs. First, all Allow directives are evaluated; at least one must match, or the request is rejected. Next, all Deny directives are evaluated. If any matches, the request is rejected. Last, any requests which do not match an Allow or a Deny directive are denied by default. –  Gerben Apr 3 '12 at 19:52
    
Thanks! Would you please confirm that "allow, deny" will work as intended as long as I dont use deny for all? –  Gaia Apr 3 '12 at 20:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 49 down vote accepted

Update : for the new apache 2.4 jump directly to the end.

The Order keyword and his relation with Deny and Allow Directives is a real nightmare. It would be quite interesting to understand how we ended up with such configuration solutions, which is a least non intuitive.

  • The first important point is that the Order keyword will have a big impact on how Allow and Deny directives are used.
  • The second point is that Deny and Allow directives are not applied in the order they are written, it must be seen as two blocks of directives (one the for Deny, one for the Allow) where all lines are applied.
  • The third point is that it does not apply like firewall rules, not at all, especially, rules are all read and the process is not stopping at the first match

Now you have to main modes:

The Order-Deny-Allow-mode, or Allow-anyone-except-this-list-or-maybe-not

Order Deny,Allow
  • This is an allow by default mode. Where you will give optionnaly a list of Deny rules.
  • Then the Deny rules are checked, to reject requests based on theses rules.
  • If someone gets rejected by one of the Deny rules you can maybe get him back with an Allow rule.

I would call it

Policy Allow
Rule Deny
     list of Deny rules
Exception
     list of Allow rules

The Order-Allow-Deny-mode, or Reject-everyone-except-this-list-or-maybe-not

Order Allow,Deny
  • This is a Deny by default mode. Where you will give optionnaly a list of Allow rules.
  • Then the Allow rules are checked, And someone willing access must match at least one rule.
  • If someone gets allowed by one of the Allow rules you can still reject him with a Deny rule.

In the simplified form:

Policy Deny
Rule Allow
     list of Allow rules
Exception
     list of Deny rules

Back to your case

You need to allow a list of networks which are the country networks. And in this country you want to exclude some proxies IP.

You have taken the Allow-anyone-except-this-list-or-maybe-not mode, so by default anyone can access your server, except proxies IP listed in the Deny list (and with the Deny from all you remove the access for anyone which was set by default) but if they get rejected you still allow the country Networks. That's not good.

By inverting the Order to order allow,deny you will be in the Reject-everyone-except-this-list-or-maybe-not mode. So you will reject access to everyone but allow the country networks and then for allowed people you will reject the proxies IP. And of course you must remove the Deny from all as stated by @Gerben and @Michael Slade (this answer is just an exaplanation of why they are right).

The Deny from all is usually seen with order deny,allow to remove the allow by default of this mode and make a simplier version (more readable) by simply using a list of IP to allow after that (for example). You do not need that rule and your case is a perfect case of this 3-time access mode (default policy, list of exception, exceptions of exceptions).

But the guys who made theses configurations tokens are certainly mad, for sure.

Update : This is not true anymore with Apache 2.4

The whole authorization/Requirements sections has been refactored in apache 2.4 with RequireAll, RequireAny and RequireNone directives. See for example this complex logic example.

so this strange logic will soon be the past, and to quote the new documentation:

Controling how and in what order authorization will be applied has been a bit of a mystery in the past

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Regilero. I haven't had a chance to test it yet, but I will accept Gerben as correct. –  Gaia Apr 9 '12 at 21:25
    
+1 for explaining with pseudocode & all. –  m000 Sep 19 '12 at 13:37
    
Yea...this is a way better answer...Thanks alot for this post –  ChristopherW Feb 12 '13 at 15:27
    
Excellent answer, thanks ! –  Dax Mar 30 at 12:51

Just use order allow,deny instead and remove the deny from all line.

share|improve this answer
6  
-1 for answer without further explanation. –  m000 Sep 19 '12 at 13:36
    
Yes, this should have an explanation! See below. –  mcb Oct 10 '12 at 23:53

Change your code to

<Limit GET POST>
deny from all

allow from 139.82.0.0/16
allow from 143.54.0.0/16
allow from 186.192.0.0/11
allow from 186.224.0.0/11
</Limit>

This way your htaccess will deny every except those that you explicitly allow with allow from..

A proxy within the allow range can easily be overwritten with an additional deny from.. rule.

share|improve this answer

As Gerben suggested, just change:

order deny,allow
deny from all

to

order allow,deny

And the restrictions will work as you want them to.

Details can be found in Apache's docs.

share|improve this answer
3  
The whitespace in allow, deny is faulty. order takes one argument, 'allow,deny', 'deny,allow', or 'mutual-failure' –  Chris Wesseling Sep 4 '12 at 16:18

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