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class A{
    public:
        void foo(int x)
        {
            cout << "foo with one\n";
        }

        void foo(int x, int y=10)
        {
            cout << "foo with two\n";
        }
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    a.foo(1);   //error?
}

So, why can't I overload void foo(int) with a function that takes a default parameter?

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3  
Which function should be called in case of foo(10)? If you answer this question you will see your solution is redundant. –  dexametason Mar 30 '12 at 13:08
    
Why would you want to do that? Do you really have two different functions with the same name that can be called with the same arguments and perform different tasks? If you need two different implementations consider providing different names, other developers will be glad to recognize by name what they are doing... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 30 '12 at 13:15
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas, well actually no. But that just crossed my mind, :-) –  Alcott Mar 30 '12 at 13:22

5 Answers 5

No you can't, there will be an ambiguity when calling the function with a single parameter.

And if you need to do this, it's a code smell.

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Why not?

class A{
public:

    void foo(int x=10, int y=10)
    {
        cout << "foo with two\n";
    }

};

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Fred Nov 15 '12 at 15:36

No you cannot overload functions on basis of value of the argument being passed, So overloading on the basis of value of default argument is not allowed either.

You can only overload functions only on the basis of:

  • Type of arguments
  • Number of arguments
  • Sequence of arguments &
  • Qualifiers like const and volatile.

Ofcourse, Whether the overload is accepted by the compiler depends on the fact:
If the compiler resolve calling of the function unambiguously.

In your case, the compiler cannot resolve the ambiguity, for ex: The compiler wouldn't know which overloaded function to call if you simple called the function as:

 foo(100);

The compiler cannot make the decision and hence the error.

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So, I can't overload a function with another one which differs from the first by just a default arg? –  Alcott Mar 30 '12 at 13:11
    
@Alcott: No you can't, How will the compiler decide which function to call? There is no way for the compiler to determine that if the only difference is an default argument. –  Alok Save Mar 30 '12 at 13:13
    
It's funny that your second paragraph contradicts your first, because the number of arguments differs. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 30 '12 at 13:13
    
@LuchianGrigore: Yeah funny okay.Looks like You are having a lot of fun. –  Alok Save Mar 30 '12 at 13:22
    
Well yeah, but because it's friday, that's always a good thing. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 30 '12 at 13:25

I think you can't. Because function/operator overloading is resolved by compiler at compile time. So overloading a function just by providing a default argument will cause ambiguity and compiler error.

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Think about it - at compile time the compiler has to decide what one to chose. I cannot unless you supply both parameters. So the compiler has no choice but to throw its hands up and say that try again with code that does not require Mystic Meg.

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