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I am trying to write a php function to stop MySQL injection attempts. What I am doing is using str_replace() to remove symbols and replace them with with their HTML character code. My issue is that the codes all contain &#; but I also want to replace those symbols with their codes. How can I do this without changing the code into something like:

&#38&#59;&338&#59;#35&#59;32&#59;

Here is my function:

function replaceSymbols( $text )
{
   $text = str_replace( '#', '&#35', $text );
   $text = str_replace( '&', '&' $text ); 
   $text = str_replace( ';', '&#59', $text );

   $text = str_replace( ' ', ' ' $text );
   $text = str_replace( '!', '!' $text );
   $text = str_replace( '"', '"' $text );   
   $text = str_replace( '$', '$' $text );
   $text = str_replace( '%', '%' $text );  
   $text = str_replace(  "'" '&#39', $text );
   $text = str_replace( '(', '(' $text );
   $text = str_replace( ')', ')' $text );
   $text = str_replace( '*', '*' $text );   
   $text = str_replace( '+', '&#43', $text );
   $text = str_replace( ',', ',' $text );
   $text = str_replace( '-', '-' $text );
   $text = str_replace( '.', '.' $text );   
   $text = str_replace( '/', '&#47', $text );
   $text = str_replace( ':', ':' $text );   
   $text = str_replace( '<', '&#60;' $text );
   $text = str_replace( '=', '&#61;' $text );
   $text = str_replace( '>', '&#62;' $text );   
   $text = str_replace( '?', '&#63', $text );
   $text = str_replace( '[', '&#91', $text );
   $text = str_replace( '\\', '&#92;' $text );
   $text = str_replace( ']', '&#93;' $text );
   $text = str_replace( '^', '&#94;' $text );   
   $text = str_replace( '_', '&#95', $text );
   $text = str_replace( '`', '&#96', $text );
   $text = str_replace( '{', '&#123;' $text );
   $text = str_replace( '|', '&#124;' $text );   
   $text = str_replace( '}', '&#125', $text );
   $text = str_replace( '~', '&#126', $text );

   return $text;

}
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Most of those characters do not increase risk of SQL injection. The mysql_real_escape_string() function handles all characters that need to be handled. And that function know how to account for character sets, which your function does not. –  Bill Karwin Jun 15 '09 at 5:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Have you looked at mysql_real_escape_string?

Escapes special characters in the unescaped string, taking into account the current character set of the connection so that it is safe to place it in a mysql_query().

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2  
When you start thinking to yourself, "Self, this is a common problem..." then the answer is usually "use the library function!" That's why they're there. You should assume, until convinced otherwise, that the library function will be better, faster, safer, cheaper (to code, etc). –  Larry K Jun 15 '09 at 3:16

Is there any reason that mysql_real_escape_string($text) doesn't fulfill your needs?

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Others have mentioned mysql_real_escape_string() which works very well. If you really want to convert to entities have a look at htmlentities(). If that's still not converting all the characters you want you can also use strtr() like so:

$entities = array(
    '#' => '&#35;',
    '&' => '&#38;',
    ....
);

$converted = strtr($input, $trans);
share|improve this answer

don't try to solve such fundamental problems - they're already solved. except if you want to learn the basics, but then don't use your solutions in production enviroments. the query escaping problem is solved, by either using mysql_real_escape_string or using parameterized queries, and it works. homebrewed solutions often have subtle bugs or specialities that render them useless. i can't find the article now, but jeff atwood at coding horror (or was it joel?) wrote about a friend who tried to do his own strip_tags function ... and failed. recently, the same for encryption: homebrew fails almost always.

your method:
... isn't very well suited for the task at hand, because classical string escaping is fully reversible, while your method is a one way function (not unrelated to hashing ^^).

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Why aren't you using placeholders? ANY sort of escaping scheme is not going to work either because you forgot something or because suddenly you want to output in some sort of other format (where HTML character entities no longer work).

Driver dependent, beyond safety, you may also get additional additional benefits from placeholders like faster network transfers (numbers transfered as native ints, floats, etc instead of strings) and parsing, network speed boosts from using prepared statements.

UPDATE Apparently the mysql* interface doesn't support placeholders. This basically means that it is not safe or suitable for any sort of deployment, look for another driver.

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FWIW, Placeholders for query parameters, and prepared statements in general, are not supported by the most common MySQL API for PHP. –  Bill Karwin Jun 15 '09 at 5:49
1  
?? Wow, that is outrageous. Good to know. Just out of curiosity, why aren't people just using PDO? –  Trey Jun 15 '09 at 15:48

I strongly advise you to follow the canned solutions others have posted, such as mysql_real_escape_string(). That said, your function is flawed in a key way. When you are securing something, your default policy should be to deny by default. That means that you assume that any given input or request is an attack, and then examine the input and if you can determine something is definately not an attack, allow it. In the context of your function, that would mean that you check to see if the input is in a set of known, acceptable characters, and escape everything else. pseudocode:

function replaceSymbols(text):
    result = ""
    for each character c in text:
       if isalpha(c) or isdigit(c):
           append c to result
       else
           append escape(c) to result
    return result
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