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Given the following table structure

images                 data
 ------------------    ----------------------------------
| id    | filename |  | fromImageId | toImageId | result |
 ------------------    ----------------------------------

I have the following SELECT to get all images.filename that do not have an entry in data (either fromImageId or toImageId)

SELECT image.id, image.filename
FROM images image
WHERE NOT EXISTS(
    SELECT fromImageId, toImageId
    FROM data results
    WHERE fromImageId = image.id
        OR toImageId = image.id
) ORDER BY image.id

As the data table is quite large (500,000+) this query takes a very long time to compute (around 10-15 seconds).

I'm very sure there is much optimization to be done here, but I can't quite get my head around what I could do to optimize the query.

PS: images.id is a PRIMARY KEY and both fromImageId and toImageId are FOREIGN KEYs on images.id

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Do you have Indexes on the fromImageId and toImageId columns? – Hiro2k Mar 30 '12 at 14:34
    
I'm always leery of the efficiency of OR clauses in SQL. Maybe try rewriting this as two queries, one for fromImage and one for toImage and then intersecting the result? – KernelM Mar 30 '12 at 14:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted

ensure your "Data" table has AT LEAST two indexes... One on just the FROM image id, the other on To Image ID. Then, slightly different than Michael was proposing

select STRAIGHT_JOIN
      i.ID,
      i.FileName
   from
      Images i
         LEFT JOIN Data d1
            on i.ID = d1.FromImageID
         LEFT JOIN Data d2
            on i.ID = d2.ToImageID
   where
          d1.FromImageID is null
      AND d2.ToImageID is null

With the two individual indexes, this query starts with you image file and gets lined-up with TWO versions of your Data table... respectively joined by EITHER from or to image values AT THE SAME TIME. So now, it should just blow through and kick out only those entries where BOTH "Data" tables DONT find a match.

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This is amazing. Every other query took around 10-15 seconds, this ones maximum was just under 20ms. Amazing! – Florian Peschka Mar 31 '12 at 11:26
    
Just one question to understand it correctly; what does the STRAIGHT_JOIN do? Is it necessary and if yes, why? – Florian Peschka Mar 31 '12 at 11:32
    
@florianpeschka, see my other link for clarification... stackoverflow.com/questions/9936532/… – DRapp Apr 1 '12 at 1:40
SELECT
    images.id,
    filename
FROM
    images
LEFT JOIN `data` ON images.id = fromImageId
OR images.id = toImageId
WHERE
    fromImageId IS NULL AND toImageId IS NULL

And ensure indexes are on fromImageId and toImageId.

share|improve this answer
    
data doesn't have an id-field – Florian Peschka Mar 30 '12 at 21:09
    
So it doesn't. I've changed my answer to reflect that. I don't know if the *ImageIds can be NULL so I've had to make sure both of them are NULL (because they can't both be NULL and join to the images table (assuming that images.id can't be NULL)). – MichaelRushton Mar 31 '12 at 5:39

NOT IN might be a better choice. Haven't tested it, but please try the following

SELECT image.id, image.filename
FROM images image
WHERE image.id NOT IN(
    SELECT IFNULL(fromImageId, toImageId)
    FROM data results
    WHERE fromImageId = image.id
        OR toImageId = image.id
) ORDER BY image.id
share|improve this answer

Another way I can think of forming this query is:

SELECT image.id, image.filename
FROM images image
WHERE image.id NOT IN(
    SELECT fromImageId, toImageId
    FROM data results
) ORDER BY image.id

don't really know about the "optimization" it will do, but maybe you should think of making this a Stored Procedure.

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