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Possible Duplicate:
Calling virtual method in base class constructor
Calling virtual functions inside constructors

How can I call a protected virtual method from a constructor in C++?

class Foo
{
   Foo(){
       printStuff();  // have also tried this->printStuff()
   }
  protected:
   virtual void printStuff() {}
}

class ExtendedFoo : public Foo {
  protected:
   virtual void printStuff() { cout << "Stuff" << endl;}
}

...

ExtendedFoo exFoo; // should print "Stuff"
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marked as duplicate by Ben Voigt, Ed Heal, D.Shawley, Amardeep AC9MF, bernie Mar 30 '12 at 15:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
see also stackoverflow.com/questions/962132/… – D.Shawley Mar 30 '12 at 14:31
up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's no problem in calling a protected function from the constructor - just do it. However, what you seem to be wanting is to call into a concrete derived class' implementation of it, e.g., ExtendedFoo's, since it's virtual - right? That's a no-go, since inside the Foo constructor, the object being created is still of type Foo, not ExtendedFoo, so no virtual dispatch can take place. If the protected function isn't pure virtual, the Foo implementation is called, i.e., the constructor will call the class' own implementation.

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According to the standards, call to a pure virtual member inside a constructor is undefined behaviour. – fljx Mar 30 '12 at 16:16
    
Yes, that's why I wrote that a call to a non-pure virtual function will "succeed". – Johann Gerell Mar 30 '12 at 20:05

Consider that when your base constructor is called, your actual constructor still does not, so you object is not completely formed.

If your object isn't yet formed, you can't expect it to act correctly.

Please read this:

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You can, but you will get Foo's implementation because ExtendedFoo's not been constructed. This is defined.

Similar problem: C++ design pattern: multiple ways to load file

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Answer deprecated after question change:

If it is protected in ExtendedFoo, you can not call it from outside of ExtendedFoo. The line...

exFoo.printStuff();

violated the function's protection level.

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/lnxpcomp/v8v101/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.xlcpp8l.doc%2Flanguage%2Fref%2Fcplr129.htm

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thanks you're right, i phrased my question badly, corrected that – chillitom Mar 30 '12 at 14:33

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