Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Getting a segmentation fault for the following code. Please advise.

struct columns {
      char* c_name;
      char* c_type;
      char* c_size;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  int column_num = 3;
  struct columns col[10];
  //columns *col = (columns*) malloc (sizeof(columns) * column_num);
  strcpy(col[0].c_name, "PSID");
  strcpy(col[0].c_type, "INT");
  strcpy(col[0].c_size, "4");
}

I am using 2 ways to allocate space for columns structure but continue to get a segmentation fault. Am I missing something?

share|improve this question
    
that's the most asked question on SO... –  UmNyobe Mar 30 '12 at 14:31
1  
C or C++? This is important, the way you'd ("idiomatically") do this is different in both languages. –  Mat Mar 30 '12 at 14:32
    
Your main needs a return statement. –  saadtaame Mar 30 '12 at 14:39
    
If you're writing C++ use std::string. –  Peter Wood Mar 30 '12 at 14:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this (strdup takes care of storage but remember to free when you are done):

struct columns {
  char* c_name;
  char* c_type;
  char* c_size;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  int column_num = 3;
  struct columns col[10];

  col[0].c_name = strdup("PSID");
  col[0].c_type = strdup("INT");
  col[0].c_size = strdup("4");

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

None of your pointers in the structure are actually initialized to anything. You have to give them a dimension, or dynamically allocate some memory for them.

share|improve this answer
    
Exact answer... –  Anantha Krishnan Mar 30 '12 at 14:34

col[0].c_name is a pointer, but doesn't point to any memory. That's why it will segfault.

Before copying anything in it allocate some memory using an array char c_name[256]; or malloc().

share|improve this answer

You never allocate memory and initialize your char* pointers.

Like

strcpy(col[0].c_name=malloc(sizeof "PSID"),"PSID");

Of course, you need to check for errors and make it otherwise meaningful.

share|improve this answer

You allocate space for columns structure, but not for strings that you want to store. Your pointers (i.e. c_name) are left uninitialized, pointing to some random memory locations, thus you invoke undefined behavior right away.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.