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I have this question. I can understand that the web pages is only interpretable by humans not by machines. So we create vocabularies and semantics and represent the information in rdf in a directed graph format so that the machines can even interpret it. We have subject predicate and object where the subjects,predicate and objects can be uris. But I am confused are we supposed to have a rdf corresponding to each page of a website so that for interpretation by human the humans can see the webpage but the machines, they can use the rdf version. Am I correct?

Also I have seen that using ontology engineering, we generate rules using association rule analysis. I have some confusion in this as well. Lets say I want to create an ontology for a domain lets say medical. Then I using association rule mining I mine the websites, or other data to get some associations. But doing this I can only define relation between concepts. How can I get a new concept itself using this mining?

Also how can we use this newly created ontologies. Are we supposed to add them to the website how? I am not clear. So need some suggesions?

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Perhaps you could state what is the problem you are trying to solve. What is your use case? If you want and have enough motivation you can also read a book which will clarify a lot of things in relation to ontologies, here: workingontologist.org –  castagna Mar 31 '12 at 7:24

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But I am confused are we supposed to have a rdf corresponding to each page of a website so that for interpretation by human the humans can see the webpage but the machines, they can use the rdf version. Am I correct?

RDF is a data model that, like the relational model, can be used to store all sorts of information. It does not need to be attached to a web page. In fact, it can even exist independently of the Web. Web pages may embed RDF data directly inside the HTML code (with RDFa) so you don't necessarily need different representations for humans and machines. HTML pages can be separated completely from RDF data but machines can be directed to the right place in different ways, e.g., via a link in the header of web pages, or with a semantic sitemap.

In Linked Data circles, things must be described using HTTP URIs to identify them. When you look up the URI, you should get a description of the thing and in this case, it is considered good practice to provide RDF for software applications which require it, and HTML to user agents interacting with humans (such as a Web browser). For instance, if you go to http://dbpedia.org/resource/Lyon with your Web browser, you get this. If you go to the same URI with a Web crawler, you may get that instead.

How can I get a new concept itself using this mining?

Ontology engineering and rule mining are different things. Usually, ontologies are designed without rule mining. Concepts normally emerge as a result of an agreement among the people who wish to design an ontology for a certain purpose. However, it is possible to guess new concepts out of a mining process, possibly text mining or association rule mining. But this does not relate to how to use ontologies.

Also how can we use this newly created ontologies.

Most of the time, you use ontologies just by utilising the terms of the ontologies. For instance, assuming you want to describe Jim, a person whose full name is James D. Goo. In RDF, you know you identify things with URIs so you'll need a URI for Jim, say http://yourdomain.com/jim, abbreviated yd:jim for conciseness (you have to decide your own URI scheme for that). Now you want to say that Jim is a person. For this, you have the special predifined predicate rdf:type:

 yd:jim  rdf:type  <aClassThatRepresentsPeople> .

Now, you could mint a new URI of your own for <aClassThatRepresentsPeople> but this is where ontologies come into play. The class of people is going to be reused over and over again, so you want it to be a term that is shared by many. To use the term of an ontology, you can simply write its URI. You don't need anything special that explains whence the term come, nor an import statement. As URI are supposed to be universal, it is clear that you are using the very same term as the one defined in the ontology. Moreover, if the ontology follows Linked Data best practices, the URI of the class should be dereferenceable, so that when you look up the URI with an HTTP GET, you get a definition of the term. Same for the name of Jim. You would like to say something like this in RDF:

yd:jim  <theNameAttribute>  "James D. Goo" .

Here, you don't need a URI for the name itself, which is just a character string (though it would be possible to give it an identifier such that you can decompose it into first name, middle name, last name, etc). Again, for <theNameAttribute> you simply reuse a property defined in the ontology. So in the end, you may have something that look like this:

yd:jim  rdf:type  foaf:Person .
yd:jim  foaf:name  "James D. Goo" .

where foaf: is a prefix for the FOAF Ontology, a popular one for describing people online.

Are we supposed to add them to the website how?

Not really but to a certain extent yes. You may reuse an existing ontology (like FOAF) which is found on a completely different website. That's the beauty of the Web and of Linked Data: it's distributed and modularised. But if you use your own ontology (say http:yourdomain.com/ontology), you should make this ontology accessible via dereferencing, that is, if you lookup the terms of the ontology (e.g., http:yourdomain.com/ontology#person) your server should respond with a description of the ontology or at least of the term requested. You just add the ontology the way you would add any file to your website.

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