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In a try block I'm populating a std::list with new native objects. In my finally block I'm iterating through the list deleting each native object.

I get an "Expression: list iterators incompatible" assertion when iterating in my finally.

I've created 3 test methods:

  1. Method returns outside the try-catch-finally. This runs fine.
  2. Method returns inside the try. Get exception when iterating in finally.
  3. Method returns inside the try, but I removed the catch. This was just something I happened to discover and can't explain. But this one runs fine too.

Can someone explain what's going on here and the best fix? I've uploaded a very simple test solution here.

It's a VS2010 solution. The app is a WPF app targeting 64-bit, but that could be easily changed if needed.

EDIT: Here's the CLI code that demonstrates the 3 scenarios above.

int CLITryCatchFinallyBug_CLI::CliClass::Test1()
{
    // RETURNS AT END.  RUNS FINE.

    std::list<NativeClass*> nativeClassList;

    try
    {       

        for(int i=0; i<10; i++)
        {
            nativeClassList.push_back(new NativeClass(100,200));
        }

        // NOTICE RETURN IS AT END.
    }
    catch(std::exception& e)
    {

    }
    finally
    {
        // Delete the native objects.
        std::list<NativeClass*>::iterator deleteIterator;
        for (deleteIterator = nativeClassList.begin(); 
            deleteIterator != nativeClassList.end();
            deleteIterator++)
        {
            delete *deleteIterator;
        }
    }

    return 1;
}

int CLITryCatchFinallyBug_CLI::CliClass::Test2()
{
    // RETURN WITHIN TRY.  GETS EXCEPTION IN FINALLY.

    std::list<NativeClass*> nativeClassList;

    try
    {       

        for(int i=0; i<10; i++)
        {
            nativeClassList.push_back(new NativeClass(100,200));
        }

        // NOTICE RETURN IS HERE WITHIN TRY
        return 1;
    }
    catch(std::exception& e)
    {

    }
    finally
    {
        // Delete the native objects.
        std::list<NativeClass*>::iterator deleteIterator;
        for (deleteIterator = nativeClassList.begin(); 
            deleteIterator != nativeClassList.end();
            deleteIterator++)  // WILL GET EXCEPTION HERE!
        {
            delete *deleteIterator;
        }
    }   
}

int CLITryCatchFinallyBug_CLI::CliClass::Test3()
{
    // SAME AS TEST 2 BUT WITHOUT THE CATCH BLOCK.  NO EXCEPTION.

    std::list<NativeClass*> nativeClassList;

    try
    {       

        for(int i=0; i<10; i++)
        {
            nativeClassList.push_back(new NativeClass(100,200));
        }

        // NOTICE RETURN IS HERE WITHIN TRY
        return 1;
    }
    // NOTICE THIS IS THE SAME AS TEST2 EXCEPT I'VE REMOVED THE CATCH
    finally
    {
        // Delete the native objects.
        std::list<NativeClass*>::iterator deleteIterator;
        for (deleteIterator = nativeClassList.begin(); 
            deleteIterator != nativeClassList.end();
            deleteIterator++)  // UNLIKE TEST2, NO EXCEPTION
        {
            delete *deleteIterator;
        }
    }   
}
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4  
Rather than asking people to download a whole solution, can't you create a short but complete console app which you could post in the question? –  Jon Skeet Mar 30 '12 at 14:47
    
If you're returning in the middle, then your std::list, scoped at method level, has likely already been cleaned up (it's destructor was called) by the time the finally block is reached. –  user645280 Mar 30 '12 at 17:26
2  
Repeat after me: "This is C++. I will use RAII for exception-safety and not try-finally. I will use RAII for exception safety and not try-finally." –  Ben Voigt Mar 30 '12 at 18:44
    
@ Jon Skeet - I've edited my post and added some code. @ ebyrob - My std::list is constructed before the try, so I think I'm ok there. @ Ben Voigt - RAII is new to me. Perhaps I'll look into it. Thanks. –  Buzz Apr 2 '12 at 13:15
    
I haven't gotten any responses since I edited my post with code. Can anyone make sense of what's happening? –  Buzz Apr 8 '12 at 3:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've seen the same problem with the sample below in VS 2013. It seems that the C++/CLI exception-handling implementation destructs native C++ types too early. I tried to report the bug to MS, but apparently I'm "not authorized to submit the feedback for this connection."

const CString foo = "foo";
try
{
    return;
}
catch (Exception^ ex)
{
}
finally
{
    const CString bar = foo; // AccessViolationException
}

The exception only happens when there's a catch block and the try block has an explicit return.

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