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I have following demonstration code:

template <int i, typename T, typename U>
T func(const U &t){return i * t;}

template <int i, typename T>
T func(const T &t){return 2 * i * t;}

int main()
{
        return func<1, int>(1);
}

Which is a boiled down version of my real code, so it seems useless but should suffice to show the problem:

In function ‘int main()’:                                                  
11:23: error: call of overloaded ‘func(int)’ is ambiguous
11:23: note: candidates are:
2:3: note: T func(const U&) [with int i = 1, T = int, U = int]
5:3: note: T func(const T&) [with int i = 1, T = int]

So it is clear that the automatic type inference (for template parameter U) interferes with my interests of picking the right version of the template function (which is the one that has only 2 parametrs)

I need both versions to have a basic and a specialized template, that do things a little different.

So the question is: Is there any possibility to tell the compiler not to infer the type automatically at this point (for example by somehow saying: Take the template that has only 2 parameters)?

share|improve this question
2  
You mean besides the obvious? (which is to give those to function templates different names - what's the point of having the same name if you need to do something yourself to instruct the compiler on which one to use?) –  Mat Mar 30 '12 at 15:01
    
Well this would be the last choice but I would like the functions to share the same name. –  Nobody Mar 30 '12 at 15:02
    
I would also suggest a redesign by renaming. For me this seems like a very bad code smell. People already get confused easily by the question which function of a overloaded set is being used. If something like this is present it makes it even harder and might lead to unmaintainable code later. –  LiKao Mar 30 '12 at 16:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can pass an initializer list, which effectively disables deduction (but causes list-initialization of parameters which in this case of int has the same effect though):

template <int i, typename T, typename U>
T func(const U &t){return i * t;}

template <int i, typename T>
T func(const T &t){return 2 * i * t;}

int main()
{
        return func<1, int>({1});
}

But in your case, if you call func<N>(...) you seem to want to call the second one, and if you call func<N, T>(...) you always seem to want to call the second one too, and only for func<N, T, U>(...) you want to call the first one, so you can always disable deduction for U by making the parameter a nondeduced context for it

template <int i, typename T, typename U>
T func(typename std::common_type<const U &t>::type t){return i * t;}

template <int i, typename T>
T func(const T &t){return 2 * i * t;}

int main()
{
        return func<1, int>({1});
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is pretty much what I was asking for. Although I circumvented the problem now I think this suits the question much better. –  Nobody Apr 2 '12 at 10:11

You cannot disable type inference, but you can use SFINAE to inhibit one of the overloads:

template <int N, typename T, typename U>
typename std::enable_if< !std::is_same<T,U>::value, T >::type
func( const U & t ) {
   return i*t;
}

That basically creates a templated function for which substitution will fail if the inferred type U is the type T, at which point SFINAE will remove the template from the set of potential candidates and the other template will be picked up.

If you don't have a C++11 enabled compiler, the enable_if and is_same templates are simple to write... just google for them or drop a comment.

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This may solve my problem but it does not answer the question. Maybe you have an answer for this, too? –  Nobody Mar 30 '12 at 15:30
1  
Type inference is part of the language, and you cannot just disable it. You can in some cases (as the one above) disable an overload so that it will not be considered under some circumstances. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 30 '12 at 15:46
    
Probably I should have used another wording. I did not mean the automatic type inference but the fact, that the template parameter is set automatically. So basically I was asking for a syntax that tells the compiler: Take the template with this parameter signature! –  Nobody Mar 30 '12 at 19:52
    
@Nobody: That is exactly type inference. Without type inference you would have to provide all of the template arguments, and in your case, because you have only two arguments, it would not have caused any ambiguity. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 30 '12 at 20:26

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