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I have a code which reads around (10^5) int(s) from stdin and then after performing ## i output them on stdout. I have taken care of the INPUT part by using "setvbuf" & reading lines using "fgets_unlocked()" and then parsing them to get the required int(s). I have 2 issues which i am not able to come over with:

1.) As i am printing int(s) 5 million on stdout its taking lot of time : IS THERE ANY WAY TO REDUCE THIS( i tried using fwrite() but the o/p prints unprintable characters due to the reason using fread to read into int buffer)

2.) After parsing the input for the int(s) say 'x' i actually find the no of divisors by doing %(mod) for the no in a loop.(See in the code below): Maybe this is also a reason for my code being times out: Any suggestions on this to improved. Many thanks This is actually a problem from http://www.codechef.com/problems/PD13

# include <stdio.h>
# define SIZE 32*1024
char buf[SIZE];

main(void)
{
int i=0,chk =0;
unsigned int j =0 ,div =0;
int a =0,num =0;
char ch;

setvbuf(stdin,(char*)NULL,_IOFBF,0);

scanf("%d",&chk);
while(getchar_unlocked() != '\n');
while((a = fread_unlocked(buf,1,SIZE,stdin)) >0)
{
    for(i=0;i<a;i++)
    {
        if(buf[i] != '\n')
        {
            num = (buf[i] - '0')+(10*num);
        }
        else
        if(buf[i] == '\n')
        {   
            div = 1;
            for(j=2;j<=(num/2);j++)
            {
                if((num%j) == 0)    // Prob 2
                {
                    div +=j;
                }
            }
            num = 0;
            printf("%d\n",div); // problem 1
        }       
    }
}
return 0;
 }
share|improve this question
2  
I hardly believe that stdio is limiting. Normally. programs like this are strictly (disk) I/O bound, and CPU utilisation will be < 10% (if they are allowed to run long enough) As an experiment I would suggest redirecting stdout to /dev/null, and looking at the difference in timing. (also keep a top running in another terminal window). And -as abelenky below suggested- printf() is a cpu consumer. (but the underlying system calls such as read or write are even more costly) –  wildplasser Mar 30 '12 at 15:18
3  
5 million != 10^5 –  larsmans Mar 30 '12 at 15:21
1  
BTW: it appears your inner loop consumes all the CPU. Have you thought about factoring the number into primes, and generating the sum of all combinations of the prime factors? –  wildplasser Mar 30 '12 at 15:28
    
:D @wildplasser my answer is sitting below for few mins.... –  UmNyobe Mar 30 '12 at 15:30
    
Great minds think alike, so it seems ;-} Recombining the prime factors might be costly, too. But probably not as costly as trying every possible divisor. BTW: IMHO the question seems wrong; for some example data 1 is counted as a divisor; but the sum for input=2 is listed as 2, not 3. –  wildplasser Mar 30 '12 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

//Prob 2 Is your biggesr issue right now.... You just want to find the number of divisors?

My first suggestion will be to cache your result to some degree... but this requires potentially twice the amount of storage you have at the beginning :/.

What you can do is generate a list of prime numbers before hand (using the sieve algorithm). It will be ideal to know the biggest number N in your list and generate all primes till his square root. Now for each number in your list, you want to find his representation as product of factors, ie

n = a1^p1 * a1^p2 *... *an^pn

Then the sum of divisors will be.

((a1^(p1+1) - 1)/(a1 - 1))*((a2^(p2+1) - 1)/(a2-1))*...*((an^(pn+1) - 1)/(an-1))

To understand you have (for n = 8) 1+ 2 + 4 + 8 = 15 = (16 - 1)/(2 - 1)

It will drastically improve the speed but integer factorization (what you are really doing) is really costly...

Edit:

In your link the maximum is 5000000 so you have at most 700 primes

Simple decomposition algorithm

void primedecomp(int number, const int* primetable, int* primecount,
      int pos,int tablelen){
    while(pos < tablelen && number % primetable[pos] !=0 )
       pos++;

    if(pos == tablelen)
      return

     while(number % primetable[pos] ==0 ){
        number = number / primetable[pos];
        primecount[pos]++;
     }
     //number has been modified
     //too lazy to write a loop, so recursive call
     primedecomp(number,primetable,primecount, pos+1,tablelen);

}

EDIT : rather than counting, compute a^(n+1) using primepow = a; primepow = a*primepow;

It will be much cleaner in C++ or java where you have hashmap. At the end primecount contains the pi values I was talking about above.

Even if it looks scary, you will create the primetable only once. Now this algorithm run in worst case in O(tablelen) which is O(square root(Nmax)). your initial loop ran in O(Nmax).

share|improve this answer
    
actually the problem asks to find the SUM of divisors. Thanks for the suggestion regarding the prime factors i will use this and try to come up with a new version of the answer. –  abhi Mar 30 '12 at 15:46
    
oh sorry, updated the answer –  UmNyobe Mar 30 '12 at 15:52

Version 2 based on suggestion by @UmNyobe and @wildplasser(see above comments) The code execution took 0.12 seconds and 3.2 MB of memory on the online judge. I myself checked with 2*10^5 int(input) in the range from 1 to 5*10^5 and the execution took:

real 0m0.443s

user 0m0.408s

sys 0m0.024s

**Please see if some more optimization can be done.

enter code here
/** Solution for the sum of the proper divisor problem from codechef **/
/** @ author dZONE **/
# include <stdio.h>
# include <math.h>
# include <stdlib.h>
# include <error.h>
# define SIZE 200000

inline int readnum(void);
void count(int num);

int pft[]={2,3,5,7,11,13,17,19,23,29,31,37,41,43,47,53,59,61,67,71,73,79,83,89,97,101,103,107,109,113,127,131,137,139,149,151,157,163,167,173,179,181,191,193,197,199,211,223,227,229,233,239,241,251,257,263,269,271,277,281,283,293,307,311,313,317,331,337,347,349,353,359,367,373,379,383,389,397,401,409,419,421,431,433,439,443,449,457,461,463,467,479,487,491,499,503,509,521,523,541,547,557,563,569,571,577,587,593,599,601,607,613,617,619,631,641,643,647,653,659,661,673,677,683,691,701,709};

unsigned long long int sum[SIZE];

int k = 0;

inline int readnum(void)
{
int num = 0;
char ch;
while((ch = getchar_unlocked()) != '\n')
{
    if(ch >=48 && ch <=57)
    {
        num = ch -'0' + 10*num;
    }
}
if(num ==0)
{
    return -1;
}
return num;
    }

    void count(int num)
    {
    unsigned int i = 0;
    unsigned long long tmp =0,pfac =1;
    int flag = 0;
    tmp = num;
    sum[k] = 1;
    for(i=0;i<127;i++)
    {   
    if((tmp % pft[i]) == 0)
    {
        flag =1;                // For Prime numbers not in pft table
        pfac =1;
        while(tmp % pft[i] == 0)
        {
            tmp =tmp /pft[i];
            pfac *= pft[i];
        }
        pfac *= pft[i];
        sum[k] *= (pfac-1)/(pft[i]-1);  
    }
}
if(flag ==0)
{
    sum[k] = 1;
    ++k;
    return;
}
if(tmp != 1)                        // For numbers with some prime factors in the pft table+some prime > 705
{
    sum[k] *=((tmp*tmp) -1)/(tmp -1);
}
sum[k] -=num;
++k;
return;
    }

    int main(void)
    {
    int i=0,terms =0,num = 0;

    setvbuf(stdin,(char*)NULL,_IOFBF,0);
    scanf("%d",&terms);
    while(getchar_unlocked() != '\n');
    while(terms--)
    {
    num = readnum();
    if(num ==1)
    {
        continue;   
    }
    if(num == -1)
    {
        perror("\n ERROR\n");
        return 0;
    }

    count(num);
        }
       i =0;
       while(i<k)
       {
    printf("%lld\n",sum[i]);
    ++i;
        }   
        return 0;
         }
share|improve this answer
    
how much time for the old code??? :) –  UmNyobe Mar 31 '12 at 15:48
    
@ UmNyobe the old code was pretty bad :P was getting timed out on the online judge ...but now thanks to ur suggestion i nailed it... :) –  abhi Mar 31 '12 at 18:04

You can print far faster than printf.

Look into itoa(), or write your own simple function that converts integers to ascii very quickly.

Here's a quick-n-dirty version of itoa that should work fast for your purposes:

char* custom_itoa(int i)
{
    static char output[24];  // 64-bit MAX_INT is 20 digits
    char* p = &output[23];

    for(*p--=0;i/=10;*p--=i%10+0x30);
    return ++p;    
}

note that this function has some serious built in limits, including:

  • it doesn't handle negative numbers
  • it doesn't currently handle numbers greater than 23-characters in decimal form.
  • it is inherently thread-dangerous. Do not attempt in a multi-threaded environment.
  • the return value will be corrupted as soon as the function is called again.

I wrote this purely for speed, not for safety or convenience.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no function in c called itoa :P –  abhi Mar 30 '12 at 15:14
    
@abhi - mkssoftware.com/docs/man3/itoa.3.asp –  Ed Heal Mar 30 '12 at 15:20
    
@EdHeal: it's a common extension, but it's not part of the standard library, and is not universally supported. –  John Bode Mar 30 '12 at 15:32
1  
You are correct that nixing printf will improve performance, but to about the same degree as using a turbocharger on a pinto to speed up the drive from LA to NY. The OP's sample code has much bigger performance issues. –  Kennet Belenky Mar 30 '12 at 16:33
1  
Also, I wouldn't call it "not thread safe," I'd call it "thread hostile." Not thread safe implies that you can use it in a thread-safe way by slapping a mutex around all invocation sites. You have to do more than that to safely use this in a threaded environment. –  Kennet Belenky Mar 30 '12 at 16:34

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