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I am trying to efficiently convert the contents of a map to a string to send via socket. I have this so far...

char buffer[1024];
for (iter = my_mapy.begin(); iter != my_map.end();iter++)
{
    sprintf(buffer, "%s|%ld|%d", buffer, iter->first, iter->second);
}

While this is working, I was wondering whether it is inefficient. Google searches for the most efficient way to convert int/long/doubles to string resulted in sprintf, which is why I am using it. But I am worried that the contents of buffer are getting copied over and over, whereas I just want to append to the end. Is this correct, and if so, is there a better way to do this? Performance and speed is #1 priority.

Thanks!

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Using %s to copy a buffer to itself? That's ugly and I'm surprised it works. –  Mark Ransom Mar 30 '12 at 15:31
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're correct; the solution you proposed here will copy the buffer every time. To do better, you will have to make use of the return value of sprintf.

char buffer[1024];
char* end_of_buffer = buffer;
std::size_t remaining_space = sizeof(buffer);

for (auto iter = my_map.begin(); iter != my_map.end(); iter++)
{
    int written_bytes = snprintf(end_of_buffer, remaining_space, "|%ld|%d", iter->first, iter->second);

    if (written_bytes > 0) {
        end_of_buffer += written_bytes;
        remaining_space -= written_bytes;
    } else {
        perror("Something is wrong with the buffer");
    }
}

Notice, by the way, that I used snprintf, which keeps track of the buffer's remaining length. You should always use this instead of the unsafe version. Your application will evolve, and through great creativity you will find a way to overflow this buffer. Meanwhile the safety comes at zero additional cost.

(I mean no offense, of course.)

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I went through the answers and tested all the different methods. Each method was run 10,000,000 times. My original method (along with what i have learned to be pitfalls) took: 35.96 sec Stream method took: 30.27 sec Andres' method took: 27.98 sec I will use the streams right now, but I will definitely switch it to Andres' method later. Thanks! –  Joshua Mar 30 '12 at 16:09
1  
"I will definitely switch later" almost never happens in the real world. Either switch now, or be sure that you're happy for your current choice to stay their indefinitely. –  Steve314 Mar 30 '12 at 18:46
    
What @Steve314 said. Unless I'm on the critical path or I'm controlling field widths, I too prefer stringstreams. That choice could be totally legitimate. –  Andres Jaan Tack Mar 31 '12 at 6:46
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You should use std::ostringstreams, they're efficient and more C++-ish:

#include <sstream>

std::ostringstream oss;
for (iter = my_mapy.begin(); iter != my_map.end();iter++)
{
    oss << iter->first << "|" << iter->second;
    //oss.str() returns the string in which everything was stored.
}

After that, you can still use operator<< to append stuff at the end of the ostringstream.

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2  
+1 - they also remove a potential buffer overflow issue. –  Steve314 Mar 30 '12 at 15:29
    
That was my original thought, but almost every article I read said streams were slower but safer. My buffer should never grow more than 1024, so I am not worried about that. –  Joshua Mar 30 '12 at 15:29
    
Do you need this code to be that efficient? ostringstreams might be %10~15 slower than using sprintf. I would go for this approach anyway. –  mfontanini Mar 30 '12 at 15:31
5  
"...should never grow more than 1024..." -- Famous last words. –  Justin ᚅᚔᚈᚄᚒᚔ Mar 30 '12 at 15:34
1  
@Steve314 no, i wasn't. He's converting a map of integers to a string. Obviously one integer is not going to overflow the buffer, but do you know how many integers is he storing? I mentioned their length, since he might be thinking "it doesn't matter, they're just 200 integers", but if each of those 200 integers have 6 chars length when converted to string(fits perfectly in 32-bit integers), then he would have an overflow. BTW he's not appending any strings, they're just integers. –  mfontanini Mar 30 '12 at 18:53
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You passed buffer to sprintf as both input and output. That is undefined behavior.

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-1 correct, but not helpful. –  Andres Jaan Tack Mar 30 '12 at 15:39
    
@AndresJaanTack: actually, the questions was "is this correct, and if so...?" So it is a correct and helpful answer. –  KillianDS Mar 30 '12 at 15:43
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You should probably use stringstream instead, but if you want more efficiency then I suppose you can use straight char* for your buffer, you will just need to make sure you grow it unless you know it won't get over 1024 bytes.

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That was my original thought, but almost every article I read said streams were slower but safer. My buffer should never grow more than 1024, so I am not worried about that. –  Joshua Mar 30 '12 at 15:29
    
yes they aren't going to be as fast, but they shouldn't be THAT much slower and they are a lot safer. –  Triton Man Mar 30 '12 at 15:33
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