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I am currently trying to run a socket server that needs to receive messages with french characters such as "àéèîï" etc.

So, here's the deal : when I execute my socket server in eclipse, the messages that I receive have the right encoding because I can see the accents in the console. But when I export my socket server into a runnable jar file and execute it in a command prompt, the encoding of the messages I receive seems wrong.

I know there is a whole lot of posts about this problem but none of the solutions presented worked for me, or maybe I am missing something.

Here is some code : For my socket server :

server = new SocketServer(port, SocketServer.ASCIIINPUT) {

    @Override
    public void processMessage(String message, Socket sender) throws MessageException {
        try{
            System.out.println("Message without decoding : " + message);
            System.out.println("Message with UTF-8 decoding : " + URLDecoder.decode(message, "UTF-8"));
            System.out.println("Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : " + URLDecoder.decode(message, "ISO-8859-1"));
        } catch(Exception ex){
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void socketIterationDone() {}

};

I won't post the code of my SocketServer since it is very long but it is basically just managing connections and implementing an BufferedReader with an InputStreamReader to be able to read the received messages like this :

final BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in, Charset.forName("UTF-8")));

I also tried without specifying a Charset :

final BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in));

Here is my socket client :

try {
        Socket s = new Socket("127.0.0.1", 6005);
        s.getOutputStream().write("With UTF-8 encoding: éèï\n".getBytes(Charset.forName("UTF-8")));
        s.getOutputStream().write("With ISO-8859-1 encoding: éèï\n".getBytes(Charset.forName("ISO-8859-1")));
        s.getOutputStream().write("Without encoding: éèï".getBytes());
        s.close();
    } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

So that's it for the code. Now there are my results in the command prompt when I specify the Charset UTF-8 in my SocketServer class:

C:\Users\nx_vostro_1\Desktop>java -jar test.jar
Server listening on port: 6005
Message without decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message without decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ???
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ???
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ???
Message without decoding : Without encoding: ??
Message with UTF-8 decoding : Without encoding: ??
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : Without encoding: ??

C:\Users\nx_vostro_1\Desktop>java -Dfile.encoding=UTF-8 -jar test.jar
Server listening on port: 6005
Message without decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message without decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢´┐¢
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢´┐¢
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢´┐¢
Message without decoding : Without encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢
Message with UTF-8 decoding : Without encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : Without encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢

C:\Users\nx_vostro_1\Desktop>java -Dfile.encoding=ISO-8859-1 -jar test.jar
Server listening on port: 6005
Message without decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message without decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ???
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ???
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ???
Message without decoding : Without encoding: ??
Message with UTF-8 decoding : Without encoding: ??
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : Without encoding: ??

And now when I do not specify the Charset in my SocketServer class :

C:\Users\nx_vostro_1\Desktop>java -jar test.jar
Server listening on port: 6005
Message without decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message without decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message without decoding : Without encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with UTF-8 decoding : Without encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : Without encoding: ÚÞ´

C:\Users\nx_vostro_1\Desktop>java -Dfile.encoding=UTF-8 -jar test.jar
Server listening on port: 6005
Message without decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message without decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢´┐¢
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢´┐¢
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢´┐¢
Message without decoding : Without encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢
Message with UTF-8 decoding : Without encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : Without encoding: ´┐¢´┐¢

C:\Users\nx_vostro_1\Desktop>java -Dfile.encoding=ISO-8859-1 -jar test.jar
Server listening on port: 6005
Message without decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With UTF-8 encoding: ├®├¿├»
Message without decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with UTF-8 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : With ISO-8859-1 encoding: ÚÞ´
Message without decoding : Without encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with UTF-8 decoding : Without encoding: ÚÞ´
Message with ISO-8859-1 decoding : Without encoding: ÚÞ´

I am desesperate, I tried solving this bug for at least 30 hours, I tried every solution I found on the Internet but none of them worked :(

Please, I need help!

Thank you, Raphael

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Remember that your Windows console doesn't use neither UTF-8 nor ISO-8859-1. It probably uses CP850.

You'll see for example that éèï encode as bytes E9 E8 EF with ISO-8859-1, which decodes as ÚÞ´ with CP850.

My advice is to write everything as UTF-8, read everything as UTF-8, and verify output by writing to a text file and opening with an UTF-8 capable editor, instead of trusting what you see in the console.

Also make sure the Java compiler uses the same encoding (-encoding) as the editor you're editing your Java source with is saving it as. I strongly recommend UTF-8.

Also, that URLDecoder.decode(...) doesn't do what you think it's doing. That is, at best it's doing nothing, as it's not the opposite of String.getBytes(...). Remove it unless you actually are sending URL-encoded data.

The InputStreamReader is already decoding the bytes to Strings. For symmetry you should use OutputStreamWriter on the other end.

Make sure to always, always, always use the versions of methods that allow you to specify an encoding.

  • Never use String.getBytes() without specifying an encoding.
  • Never use new String(byte[]) without specifying an encoding.
  • Never use new InputStreamReader(InputStream) without specifying an encoding.
  • Never use new OutputStreamWriter(OutputStream) without specifying an encoding.
  • and so on.

Preferably, always use the versions that take a CharsetEncoder or a CharsetDecoder, as these can be configured to throw an exception on failed encode/decode.

Whenever you don't specify an encoding wherever it is possible, you are dependent on the platform default encoding, which is essentially a global variable with a random value.

Every place where you accidentally used the platform default encoding is a bug that may wait to manifest until you or someone else tries the program on another platform or in another country.

share|improve this answer
    
oh wow you are right, my data has the right encoding, it is just the DOS window that did not have the right output encoding. I tried writing my data into a file and it showed the text with the right encoding, and then I tried specifying CP850 when running my jar file and it was showing the right characters. Thanks a lot Christoffer! –  Raphael Royer-Rivard Apr 2 '12 at 15:17

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