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Yesterday I ran into an Issue while developing a Web Part (This question is not about webpart but about C#). Little background about the Issue. I have a code that load the WebPart using the Reflection, In which I got the AmbiguousMatchException. To reproduce it try the below code

        public class TypeA
        {
            public virtual int Height { get; set; }
        }
        public class TypeB : TypeA
        {
            public String Height { get; set; }
        }
        public class Class1 : TypeB
        {

        }

        Assembly oAssemblyCurrent = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();
        Type oType2 = oAssemblyCurrent.GetType("AmbigousMatchReflection.Class1");
        PropertyInfo oPropertyInfo2 = oType2.GetProperty("Height");//Throws AmbiguousMatchException 
        oPropertyInfo2 = oType2.GetProperty("Height", 
            BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);  // I tried this code Neither these BindingFlags or any other didnt help

I wanted to know the BindingFlag to Fetch the Height Property. You will have the question of why I wanted to create another Height Property that is already there in the Base class. That is how the Microsoft.SharePoint.WebPartPages.PageViewerWebPart was designed check the Height property of the PageViewerWebPart class.

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

There are two Height properties there, and neither of them are declared by Class1 which you're calling GetProperty on.

Now, would it be fair to say you're looking for "the Height property declared as far down the type hiearchy as possible"? If so, here's some code to find it:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Reflection;

public class TypeA
{
    public virtual int Height { get; set; }
}

public class TypeB : TypeA
{
    public new String Height { get; set; }
}

public class Class1 : TypeB
{        
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Type type = typeof(Class1);
        Console.WriteLine(GetLowestProperty(type, "Height").DeclaringType);
    }

    static PropertyInfo GetLowestProperty(Type type, string name)
    {
        while (type != null)
        {
            var property = type.GetProperty(name, BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | 
                                                  BindingFlags.Public |
                                                  BindingFlags.Instance);
            if (property != null)
            {
                return property;
            }
            type = type.BaseType;
        }
        return null;
    }
}

Note that if you know the return types will be different, it may be worth simplifying the code as shown in sambo99's answer. That would make it quite brittle though - changing the return type later could then cause bugs which would only be found at execution time. Ouch. I'd say that by the time you've done this you're in a brittle situation anyway :)

share|improve this answer
    
Well I did the same fix. I wanted to confirm its a Design issue with the class.The way in which I Designed the class is not right – Kusek Jun 15 '09 at 6:34
    
@Jon, not exactly accurate see my answer – Sam Saffron Jun 15 '09 at 6:42
    
Which bit isn't accurate? I agree that kusek could specify the desired return type, but I don't think anything I've written is actually wrong, is it? – Jon Skeet Jun 15 '09 at 6:45
    
"There are two Height properties there, and neither of them are declared by Class1" is not accurate, the call to getproperty can resolve this situation fine see BarBar2 sample – Sam Saffron Jun 15 '09 at 6:47
    
Which bit are you disputing? There are clearly two different properties. Are you claiming they are declared by Class1? They're not, which is why you won't get either of them using DeclaredOnly in conjunction with Class1. One is declared by TypeA, and the other is declared by TypeB. Just because you can ask GetProperty to resolve it doesn't mean it's declared by Class1. – Jon Skeet Jun 15 '09 at 6:56

See the following example:

    class Foo {
        public float Height { get; set; }
    }

    class Bar : Foo {
        public int Height { get; set; }
    }

    class BarBar : Bar { }

    class Foo2 : Foo{
        public float Height { get; set; }
    }

    class BarBar2 : Foo2 { } 

    static void Main(string[] args) {

        // works 
        var p = typeof(BarBar).GetProperty("Height", typeof(float), Type.EmptyTypes);

        // works
        var p2 = typeof(BarBar).BaseType.GetProperty("Height", BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);

        // works
        var p3 = typeof(BarBar2).GetProperty("Height");

        // fails
        var p4 = typeof(BarBar).GetProperty("Height"); 

        Console.WriteLine(p);

    }
  • You get an AmbiguousMatchException if a two or more properties with the differing return types and the same name live in your inheritance chain.

  • Stuff resolves just fine if you override an implementation (using new or override) and maintain the return type.

  • You can force reflection only to look at the properties for a particular type.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I did the same fix it. But is that a Design Issue ? – Kusek Jun 15 '09 at 6:29
1  
no, actually Tetraneutron has it right, this happens if you have two properties with the same Name that return different types, something that is pretty bad design anyway – Sam Saffron Jun 15 '09 at 6:33
3  
To be honest, hiding a property is a design issue to start with. It's very likely to cause issues where you're really trying to call the base Height property. I'd strongly advise you not to do it if you can possibly avoid it. If you absolutely have to, then use the "new" modifier to make it clear at the declaration point. – Jon Skeet Jun 15 '09 at 6:33
    
Agreed, I have no idea why you would want to hide a property like this. – Tetraneutron Jun 15 '09 at 6:36
    
Agreed overriding a return type of a property is a very big no-no – Sam Saffron Jun 15 '09 at 6:49

Obviously there are two properties that match the name you have given of "Height", one with return type int, and another string., Just add the return type as the second parameter tot the GetPropertyCall depending on which you want returning and this ambiguity should disappear.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah I just tested this, you only get the ambiguous exception if two properties with the same name have different return types – Sam Saffron Jun 15 '09 at 6:34

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