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code: http://jsfiddle.net/4hV6c/4/ just make any selection, and you'll get a script error in ie8

I'm trying to do this:

$(end_node.parentNode).has(start_node)

which in modern browsers (chrome, ff, opera, etc) returns [] if start_node is not in end_node.parentNode, and returns the element (I forget which) if it is found.

now, end_node is a text element, and the parentNode is an actual DOM entity. IE will perform .has on just $(end_node).has(start_node) but that is obviously different behavior.

Is there a work around to get this to work?

  • in IE the fiddle will error, other browsers will alert you with a boolean value.

UPDATE: here is a word around that overrides .has() for my specific scenario.. not sure if it works for all the cases of .has, as I don't know them all. http://jsfiddle.net/8F57r/13/

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1  
If this were really true, it would be a big deal and also have a jQuery bug report associated with it, no? –  Sparky Mar 30 '12 at 16:58
    
the fiddle doesn't lie. =\ I'll see if I can contact someone at jQuery / post this somewhere. –  NullVoxPopuli Mar 30 '12 at 17:01
    
What is the intended sequence of operation and expected result in your jsFiddle? I'm getting an alert which contains "false" no matter what I do. Using Safari. –  Sparky Mar 30 '12 at 17:07
    
bugs.jquery.com/ticket/11539 a boolean value is correct. in IE, it just errors. –  NullVoxPopuli Mar 30 '12 at 17:17
    
@Sparky672 This really is true, oh ye of little faith. Now there is a bug report associated with it –  Juan Mendes Mar 30 '12 at 17:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is not jQuery

Running

console.log( $("div:has(span)").html() );
console.log( $("div").has($("span")[0]).html() );

However, the following throws an exception http://jsfiddle.net/mendesjuan/4hV6c/8/

var textNode =  $("span")[0].childNodes[0];
$("div").has(textNode);

What that means is that you can't pass a text node into $.has. You should file a bug with jQuery

The line that is erroring out is giving the following message

No such interface supported jquery-1.7.1.js, line 5244 character 3

That is trying to call the contains method on a node. What that means is that this really is an IE bug that jQuery hasn't worked around. I've reproduced the problem without needing to call $.has http://jsfiddle.net/4hV6c/10/

// This is broken in IE
var textNode =  $("span")[0].childNodes[0];
var divNode = $("div")[0];
divNode.contains(textNode);

Workaround http://jsfiddle.net/4hV6c/12/

function contains(outer, inner) {
   var current = inner;
    do {
        if (current == outer) {
           return true;
        }
    } while((current = current.parentNode) != document.body);

    return false;

}
rangy.init();

$(document).bind("mouseup", function() {
    var a = rangy.getSelection();
    start_node = a.anchorNode;
    end_node = a.focusNode;
    var b = a.getRangeAt(0);
    var c = b.commonAncestorContainer;
    b.selectNodeContents(c);
    a.setSingleRange(b);
    alert( contains( end_node.parentNode, start_node) );
});
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1  
it's not just detecting if it has a tag, i need to check for the specific element. Because what if there are multiple spans? Also, isn't that different from the jQuery selector? –  NullVoxPopuli Mar 30 '12 at 16:53
    
Checking for a specific element also works fine, see my update –  Juan Mendes Mar 30 '12 at 16:57
    
the problem is that in IE8, end_node.parentNode (which is an undetermined DOM element to me, as it could be a div, span, or whatever) does not have a .has() method. You are calling .has() an EVERY div... ALso, you are hardcoding to get the first span match.... –  NullVoxPopuli Mar 30 '12 at 16:59
    
@TheLindyHop I'm assuming just the HTML you showed us in the jsfiddle, I'm sure you know how to change the code to make the selectors more specific –  Juan Mendes Mar 30 '12 at 17:06
    
I filed a bug with jQuery bugs.jquery.com/ticket/11539 –  NullVoxPopuli Mar 30 '12 at 17:18

You could always DIY? :) I hear recursive child indexing works real quick and is pretty easy to implement.

See here for an excellent tutorial:

http://blog.swapnilsarwe.com/javascript-traversing-html-dom-recursively.html

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@KirkWoll - "mailed in"? –  Travis J Mar 30 '12 at 16:51
    
@KirkWoll - See link for details, it is actually rather easy to do. Instead of building the whole tree you can just check weather the node is the one you need. However, based on Juan's answer above it would seem that IE supports .has() making this unnecessary for the OP to do. –  Travis J Mar 30 '12 at 16:54
1  
This goes against the idea of jquery, where all the gritty stuff is done for you to help keep your own code cleaner. –  NullVoxPopuli Mar 30 '12 at 16:58
    
@TheLindyHop - I agree, however the OP asked for a workaround so I suggested a more basic javascript approach as an option. Just trying to show some different angles. –  Travis J Mar 30 '12 at 17:00
    
Fair enough. I'll take a second look. –  NullVoxPopuli Mar 30 '12 at 17:06

Does find do what you want?

rangy.init();

$(document).bind("mouseup", function() {
    var a = rangy.getSelection();
    start_node = a.anchorNode;
    end_node = a.focusNode;
    var b = a.getRangeAt(0);
    var c = b.commonAncestorContainer;
    b.selectNodeContents(c);
    a.setSingleRange(b);
    alert($(end_node.parentNode).find(start_node).length > 0);
});​
share|improve this answer
    
"Object doesn't support this property or method" =( works in not ie8 though. =\ –  NullVoxPopuli Mar 30 '12 at 17:05

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