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I am working on a new PHP project and while I like TTD, I am finding that it seem to be more hindering than being helpful at this stage of the project.

I started off writing unit tests however now that I am deeper into prototyping of some the application features, I find myself rewriting bits and pieces of the core framework along with writing the tests. It just seems like I am spending a lot more time rewriting tests where maybe I should wait until I am in more of an alpha/beta phase of the project.

Should I be writing unit test from the beginning even though there is a high chance I am going to have to rewrite them?

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5 Answers 5

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Yes, it is the best way to understand your system and create a solid API.

It sounds like you need to move your tests up to a higher level. Don't test individual methods, test units of functionality. The more recent buzzword is BDD or Context/Specification but it's not really a different thing since I've yet to meet a tdd practitioner that wasn't at least trying to move in that direction.

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I take issue with your statement. TDD is certainly one way of designing a system, but for really nailing a design, it is no replacement for doing proper requirements analysis, and fully understanding the problem domain before you write a single line of code, test case or otherwise. - Even given that, I would also argue that "building one to throw away" is also more likely to be enlightening. –  Tyler Eaves Mar 30 '12 at 17:01
    
@TylerEaves That's true. I'll amend that in my experience, TDD is the best way of conducting proper analysis and understanding the domain that developers have at their disposal. So yes, it is a tool, it is in my opinion an incredibly powerfull tool, but it is not the only tool you should be using. –  George Mauer Mar 30 '12 at 17:05
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The only proper requirements analysis ever done, was restrospectively from the delivered software. :( –  Tony Hopkinson Mar 30 '12 at 17:14
    
@Tyler Eaves +1 for "building one to throw away". Coders can write code faster than writing a traditional spec. Let the throw-away code become a spec of sorts. –  pilotcam Mar 30 '12 at 23:04
    
@pilotcam When done purposefully its great but oh god that's a minefield. I've been on projects before where the POC just became the first version due to politics. The project never recovered. I've also been handed a crappy guy-did-it-while-learning-to-code version of an app and been told to use that as a spec. Both very difficult situations to end up in and not at all rare. –  George Mauer Mar 31 '12 at 2:21

If you are gonna use TDD, you better start off by using it.

If you believe it's the right choice, then use it, or you might have headaches when you decide to use it in the future.

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Agreed. TDD is awesome, and while it may make things difficult it will be even worse if you decide mid-ship to move over to using TDD. –  eandersson Mar 30 '12 at 16:55

Of course you are going to rewite them, things will change.

If you do a complete and thorough requirements analysis, things will change (more likely have changed while you were pursuing that chimera) and you'll have to re-analyse.

But if you dive right in and get some code written and some deliverables sorted, you'll have no useful analysis, no tests and then entire sales department rubbing their hands, because delivered = sellable.

Iterate, write the tests you can, fulfil them, see where you go next. TDD or classic water fall, theres a lot of work up front, before you have a bit of software.

Do the up front work second, not a lot of use and never going to happen anyway.

Maybe you need to a bit more proof of concept or story boarding, or deity forbid analysis, but all diving in does is put lying smilies on the dash board, and the only credit you'll get for that is a kick in the nads when the wheels come off, and sub-prime style technical debt crisis.

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I am finding that it seem to be more hindering than being helpful at this stage of the project.

Why is that ? Can you pin down your concerns more objectively?

now that I am deeper into prototyping of some the application features, I find myself rewriting bits and pieces of the core framework along with writing the tests. It just seems like I am spending a lot more time rewriting tests where maybe I should wait until I am in more of an alpha/beta phase of the project.

  • Don't use TDD when you're prototyping. Prototypes are to gain knowledge..quickly.. preferable in a time-box. Once you remove the uncertainity, you throw away the prototype. Start again this time with TDD.
  • Are your tests changing because you have better insight now ? Or is it the case that the tests are coupled with the implementation (knows how the test subject is implemented vs the services offered)? The former is unavoidable unless you have exemplary foresight.. requirements change, tests change. The latter is a smell.. and can be avoided by focussing on the What instead of the How?
  • The problem with waiting till your product/app stabilizes is that.. you may end up procrastinating forever OR you may end up with a design that is difficult to test. This will make writing tests (later) harder than it had to be. TDD goes easier if you are working in small increments on a testable base of code. The tests are also a safety net, which help you make changes with confidence and provide instant feedback.
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Have a plus for safety net, it's part of having tests that people don't often acknowledge. Tend to think more of test as a final validation of the implementation instead of being a part of the process, whether they are done first or last / never –  Tony Hopkinson Mar 31 '12 at 19:03
  • Yes, I think it's very important to start writing tests from very begining. TDD (Test Driven Development) is not just about testing individual classes on their own. It should guide decisions that you make during the design phase.

  • When you write tests first, you will get a better understanding of your problem. You are saying that you are likely to re-write them later. If that's the case, then it probably means that you'll have a better understanding of your system, which is a good thing. You can then re-design your system by implementing further tests or re-factoring existing ones.

  • It might feel like a waste of time, but it isn't as you get a much better understanding of system you are working on.

  • One of the books that I'm currently reading (Growing Object Orientated Software Guided by Tests) mentions a "Walking Skeleton" concept. It suggests that you should use TDD to develop a minimum working solution, even if it's very basic.

  • Another important point to make is that you should try and automate your deployment from very start. This is not exactly a unit test, but it's a deployment test, which is equally if not more important than unit tests. If you do this kind of testing at the start of the project, you won't be hit by unexpected problems near the release date. You will also get a better understanding of how different components of your system fit together.

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