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import math
t=raw_input()
k=[]
a=0
for i in range(0,int(t)):
    s=raw_input()
    b=1
    c=1
    a=int(s)
    if a==0:
        continue
    else:
        d=math.atan(float(1)/b) + math.atan(float(1)/c)
        v=math.atan(float(1)/a)
        print v
        print d
        print float(v)
        print float(d)
        while():
            if float(v)== float(d):
                break
            b=b+1
            c=c+1
            d=math.atan(float(1)/float(b)) + math.atan(float(1)/float(c))
            print d
        k.append(int(b)+int(c))

for i in range(0,int(t)):
    print k[i]

as it's very evident float(v) != float(d) till b becomes 2 and c becomes 3.

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how about formatting it as readable code? –  jitter Jun 15 '09 at 6:35
1  
now it is formatted –  動靜能量 Jun 15 '09 at 6:37
3  
It is interesting that in Python, the code is formally ambiguous unless it is readable... –  Edmund Jun 15 '09 at 6:38
3  
instead of float(1), just write 1.0 :) –  mikl Jun 15 '09 at 6:42
    
nice way of explaining your code... NOT ! –  Tempus Jun 15 '09 at 6:53
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your while loop tests on an empty tuple, which evaluates to False. Thus, the statements within the while loop will never execute:

If you want your while loop to run until it encounters a break statement, do this:

while True:
    if (some_condition):
        break
    else:
        # Do stuff...
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if float(v)== float(d): break its this part thats getting executed !! –  Hick Jun 15 '09 at 6:48
    
oops it got executed ..!! thanks but true aint a keyword!! –  Hick Jun 15 '09 at 6:48
    
True and False are python keywords, not true or false. –  Triptych Jun 15 '09 at 6:51
3  
Minor correction: while does not have an "empty condition", there is no such thing in Python. "while ():" tests empty tuple "()" and, yes, empty tuple evaluates to false. Python has the same behavior for "while []:", "while '':", "while 0:", etc. –  Constantin Jun 15 '09 at 6:55
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If is very dangerous to make comparsisons like float(a)==float(b) since float variables have no exact representation. Due to rounding errors you may not have identic values.

Even 2*0.5 may not be equal 1. You may use the following:

if abs(float(a)-float(b)) < verySmallValue:
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http://www.cygnus-software.com/papers/comparingfloats/comparingfloats.htm

Floating point math is not exact. Simple values like 0.2 cannot be precisely represented using binary floating point numbers, and the limited precision of floating point numbers means that slight changes in the order of operations can change the result. Different compilers and CPU architectures store temporary results at different precisions, so results will differ depending on the details of your environment. If you do a calculation and then compare the results against some expected value it is highly unlikely that you will get exactly the result you intended. In other words, if you do a calculation and then do this comparison: if (result == expectedResult)

then it is unlikely that the comparison will be true. If the comparison is true then it is probably unstable – tiny changes in the input values, compiler, or CPU may change the result and make the comparison be false.

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Well, it didn't reach the break point. The problem is that while() does not loop at all. To do an infinite loop, do while (1): (since the while condition must evaluate to true. Here's a working (cleaned up) sample.

import math
t = raw_input()
k = []
a = 0.0
for i in range(0,int(t)):
    s = float(raw_input())
    b = 1.0
    c = 1.0
    a= float(s)
    if a == 0:
        continue
    else:
        d = math.atan(1.0/b) + math.atan(1.0/c)
        v = math.atan(1.0/a)
        print v
        print d
        while True:
            if v == d:
                print 'bar'
                break
            b += 1
            c += 1
            d = math.atan(1.0/b) + math.atan(1.0/c)
            print d
        k.append(int(b)+int(c))

for i in range(0,int(t)):
    print k[i]
share|improve this answer
1  
FWIW: "while True" is preferable to "while (1)" in Python. –  David Z Jun 15 '09 at 8:13
    
Oh, right, fixed :) –  mikl Jun 15 '09 at 8:32
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