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In MS Visual C++ 2010 SP1 this code crashes:

#include "stdafx.h"

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
//#include <vector>

int a = 0;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[]) {
    // this way it works:
    //std::vector<std::function<void ()>> s;
    //s.push_back([]() { a = 1; });
    //s.push_back([]() { a = 2; int b = a; });

    std::function<void ()> s[] = { 
        []() { a = 1; },
        []() {
            a = 2;

            // Problem occurs only if the following line is included. When commented out no problem occurs.
            int b = a;
        }
    };

    int counter = 0;
    for (auto it = std::begin(s); it != std::end(s); ++it) {
        ++counter;
        (*it)();
        std::wcout << counter << L":" << a << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

When the second array element is constructed it corrupts the first array element.

Is this an error in the compiler or have I done something that is not supported in the C++ 11 standard?

EDIT

This code works in gcc-4.5.1:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
//#include <vector>

int a = 0;

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    // this way it works:
    //std::vector<std::function<void ()>> s;
    //s.push_back([]() { a = 1; });
    //s.push_back([]() { a = 2; int b = a; });

    std::function<void ()> s[] = { 
        []() { a = 1; },
        []() {
            a = 2;

            // Problem occurs only if the following line is included. 
            //When commented out no problem occurs.
            int b = a;
        }
    };

    int counter = 0;
    ++counter;
    s[0]();
    std::wcout << counter << L":" << a << std::endl;
    ++counter;
    s[1]();
    std::wcout << counter << L":" << a << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
I don't know the answer but FWIW, works on GCC 4.6 once you've removed the MSVC specifics. –  Mat Mar 30 '12 at 17:02
    
Thank you for testing with GCC 4.6. This gives some evidence for a bug in the MS compiler. –  frast Mar 30 '12 at 17:29
    
The pointers to the lambda functions are messed up in fact, I minimized the problem into that code: #include <functional> #include <iostream> int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { std::function<void ()> s[] = { []() {std::cout << "f0" << std::endl;}, []() {int a=1; std::cout << "f1" << std::endl;} } ; s[0](); // output f1 instead of f0 s[1](); // This one fail, the pointer to the function is probably messed up return 0; } When you call s[0], it ouput "f1" And s[1] actually fails. –  olchauvin Apr 1 '12 at 16:11
2  
This is a bug. The program compiles and runs without error using the Visual C++ 11 Beta. (This will likely be the response to your Connect Bug.) –  James McNellis Apr 1 '12 at 17:19
    
@JamesMcNellis I would accept your comment as answer. –  frast Apr 2 '12 at 6:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a compiler bug. There's nothing wrong with your code.

Your program compiles and runs without error using the Visual C++ 11 Beta, so the bug appears to have been fixed for the forthcoming release of the compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
Lets hope they fix it for VC 2010 too. We cannot use C++ 11 because compiled programs do not run on Windows XP. –  frast Apr 3 '12 at 6:18
    
@frast: I wouldn't hold your breath. It's superlatively unlikely that this would warrant a patch for VC10, especially since there is a straightforward workaround (e.g., use std::vector, as you do in your second example, or initialize the array elements individually instead of using aggregate initialization). –  James McNellis Apr 3 '12 at 16:59

Where is the capture bit? If you want to modify a, don't you need [&a] in the beginning of your first lambda?

[&a]() { a = 1; },

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anonymous_function#C.2B.2B

share|improve this answer
    
a should not need to be captured: it is a global variable. –  James McNellis Apr 2 '12 at 1:19
    
If a would be not accessible then it should be a compile-time error and not a run-time error. –  frast Apr 2 '12 at 6:22

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