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Is it possible to implement associative arrays as Selectors and Values.

I have an array

   var obj = { surgeon:1, asstSurgeon:2, anesthe:3, nurse:4, scrub:5,....... };

I am able to implement like this.

$("#surgeon").click(function(){
   $("$hiddenvariable").val(1);
});

$("#asstSurgeon").click(function(){
  $("$hiddenvariable").val(2);
});

................,

Can anyone help me how can i reduce the code.

Is there any other way to implement this.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

with jQuery $.each

$.each (obj, function(key, value) {
    $("#" + key).click(function(){
       $("$hiddenvariable").val(value);
    });
 });

or Using for..in and .on. (Above method is better than below)

for (var i in obj) {
   $("#" + i).on('click', {i: obj[i]}, function(e){
       $("$hiddenvariable").val(e.data.i);
   });
}
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1  
So i is global and you don't want to filter prototype properties? Use for (var p in o) if (o.hasOwnProperty(p)). –  Thomas Allen Mar 30 '12 at 18:53
    
Your first example won't work. The handlers are all referencing the same i variable. The second solution you added will work. –  squint Mar 30 '12 at 18:54
    
@amnotiam aaww.. I see.. my bad. Thanks! –  Vega Mar 30 '12 at 18:58
    
Thanks for your help....It works for me –  Devswa Mar 30 '12 at 22:58
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How about this?

$.each(obj, function(type, i) {
    $('#' + type).click(function() { $('#hiddenvariable').val(i); });
});
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1  
You probably meant $('#' + type)? –  squint Mar 30 '12 at 18:59
1  
@amnotiam Yeah right, thanks! –  Niko Mar 30 '12 at 19:02
    
Thank you ......, –  Devswa Mar 30 '12 at 22:57
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Write a closure function in javascript, associate button ids with your closure variables and a common selector class

then use jquery

$(".selector").click(function(e){
    $("#hiddenfield").val(Closure.object[e.id]);
});

closure...

function Closure() = {}
Closure.object = {
    surgeon:1, asstSurgeon:2, anesthe:3, nurse:4, scrub:5
}
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1  
I think selecting by a class, then using the ID of the element in the handler to look up the value is a good idea. But why on earth did you create a function called Closure, only to assign a property to the Function object that has the ID/value map? Why wouldn't you just use a plain object like in the question? –  squint Mar 30 '12 at 19:04
    
its a good practice to use closures than a plain variables... you can use them like a object... add dynamic variables to it... and validations... etc... –  Dasarp Mar 30 '12 at 19:08
1  
That's not what a closure is. What you have is just a Function object to which you're assigning a property. You could do the same thing with a plain object, and it would be no different. –  squint Mar 30 '12 at 22:01
    
Thank you...... –  Devswa Mar 30 '12 at 22:59
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