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I have run into a bit of a design issue with my code. I have a object that creates a child object (the child could then create another child, etc), and both objects subscribe to the same event. But, I only want the most child object to receive the event.

Overview of what my project is: I am creating a IVR system. When a user calls into the system, the user will have X menu choices. Based on what the user chooses they will have a sub menu of choices, and so on and so on. I am using State Machines for this. Every State Machine needs to "listen" for when the user presses a number on their phone. But only the current State Machine needs to process the entered number. Each State Machine can create a new State Machine to represent the sub menu.

Here is some sample code:

Base class:

public delegate void DoSomething(object sender, EventArgs data);
public class Base
{
    public event DoSomething myEvent;
    private IObject foo;

    public Base ()
    {
        foo = new myObjectA(this);
    }

    public void SomeAction()
    {
        ((myObjectA)foo).CreateChild();
    }

    public void EventFired()
    {
        if (myEvent != null)
        {
            myEvent(this, new EventArgs());
        }
    }
}

ObjectA:

class myObjectA : IObject
{
    private Base theCallingObject;
    private IObject child;
    public myObjectA (Base _base)
    {
        theCallingObject = _base;
        theCallingObject.myEvent += new DoSomething(theCallingObject_myEvent);
    }

    public void CreateChild()
    {
        child = new myObjectB(theCallingObject);
    }

    void theCallingObject_myEvent(object sender, EventArgs data)
    {
        // Handle event
        MessageBox.Show("myObjectA");
    }
}

ObjectB:

class myObjectB : IObject
{
    private Base theCallingObject;
    public myObjectB (Base _base)
    {
        theCallingObject = _base;
        theCallingObject.myEvent += new DoSomething(theCallingObject_myEvent);
    }

    void theCallingObject_myEvent(object sender, EventArgs data)
    {
        // Handle event
        MessageBox.Show("myObjectB");
    }
}

Now when I do this:

Base blah = new Base();
blah.SomeAction();
blah.EventFired();

I get message boxes for both A and B. I need to implement Base so that only myObjectB gets the event. I will have hundreds of myObject's so I need a implementation at the Base level and NOT the myObject level. Plus, handling it at the myObject level would still require the event to be fired causing performance issues if there are hundreds of objects.

One solution I have considered is when myObjectA creates the child, unsubscribe from the event, then resubscribe when we get back to the myObjectA level. However I feel something better could be done.

Anyone have any ideas?

Edit: Using payo's input I have come up with this:

public delegate void DoSomething(object sender, EventArgs data);
public class Base
{
    private IObject foo;
    private List<DoSomething> _myEventStorage;

    public event DoSomething myEvent
    {
        add
        {
            _myEventStorage.Insert(0, value);
        }
        remove
        {
            _myEventStorage.Remove(value);
        }
    }

    public Base ()
    {
        _myEventStorage = new List<DoSomething>();
        foo = new myObjectA(this);
    }

    public void SomeAction()
    {
        ((myObjectA)foo).CreateChild();
    }

    public void EventFired()
    {
        _myEventStorage[0].Invoke(this, new EventArgs());
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Instead of a state machine, could you implement this with a thread (or the new C#5 async stuff) that waits for a button to be pressed? –  Random832 Mar 30 '12 at 19:14
    
@Random832 I don't really understand what your trying to say. But having a separate for each call would be a no go, since there can be up to 100 calls active at any instance and context switching would start to hit performance. –  jpiccolo Mar 30 '12 at 19:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For events, each subscriber is queued up (put at end of list), a FIFO model. You want the most-child object to 'own' the event, not just subscribe and be part of some abstract list of other unknown objects.

I would provide a new model that represents what you are trying to do. This might be what Jason recommended: (he posted his answer as I was typing this out)

public class Base
{
  private DoSomething _myEventStorage;
  public event DoSomething myEvent
  {
    add
    {
      _myEventStorage = value;
    }
    remove
    {
      _myEventStorage -= value;
    }
  }
...
  public void EventFired()
  {
    if (_myEventStorage != null)
    {
      _myEventStorage(this, new ChainEventArgs());
    }
  }
}

This calls last ONLY. Another option (to add to this custom add/remove) would be to provide a derived EventArgs:

public class ChainEventArgs : EventArgs
{
  public bool Handled { get; set; }
}
public delegate void DoSomething(object sender, ChainEventArgs data);

...

  public event DoSomething myEvent
  {
    add
    {
      var temp = _myEventStorage;
      _myEventStorage = null;
      _myEventStorage += value;
      _myEventStorage += temp; // now all are called, but FILO
    }
    remove
    {
      _myEventStorage -= value;
    }
  }

At this point, you can either check Handled on each IObject

void theCallingObject_myEvent(object sender, ChainEventArgs data)
{
  if (data.Handled)
    return;

  if (I_want_to_block_parents)
    data.Handled = true;
  // else leave it false
}

Or, add some complexity to your Base class and stop calling up the chain (let's the children have no need to check Handled). I'll show the solution with a List<> of delegates, but some MulticaseDelegate casts and calls could do the same. I just feel the List<> code might be more readable/maintainable.

public class Base
{
  private List<DoSomething> _myEventStorage;
  public event DoSomething myEvent
  {
    add
    {
      _myEventStorage.Insert(0, value);
    }
    remove
    {
      _myEventStorage.Remove(value);
    }
  }
...
  public void EventFired()
  {
    var args = new ChainEventArgs();
    foreach (var handler in _myEventStorage)
    {
      handler(this, args);
      if (args.Handled)
        break;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great Solution! –  jpiccolo Mar 30 '12 at 21:00

you would need to explicitly implement myEvent (add/remove) handlers and track the "farthest" independently of the registered observers. then you can send the notification to that single instance.

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