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MY query looks like this:

SELECT COUNT(entryID) 
FROM table 
WHERE date >= DATE_SUB(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 1 DAY)

Will this count the rows whose date values are within the day (starting at 12:00; not within 24 hours)? If not, how do I do so?

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I think my solution is WHERE DAYNAME(date) == CURDATE(). The problem is that DAYNAME returns word form 'Friday'. I need number form so that it can compare with CURDATE(). –  Hope4You Mar 30 '12 at 19:16
    
It will return all records for yesterday, starting from the beginning of the day, not only those within 24 hours of when it was run. –  Michael Berkowski Mar 30 '12 at 19:18
1  
SELECT DATE_SUB(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 1 DAY) returns 2012-03-29, so >= '2012-03-29 is all records from yesterday and today. –  Michael Berkowski Mar 30 '12 at 19:19
    
If you only want the previous 24 hours, use NOW() instead of CURDATE() –  Michael Berkowski Mar 30 '12 at 19:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The following should be enough to get records within the current day:

SELECT COUNT(entryID) 
FROM table 
WHERE date >= CURDATE()

As Michael notes in the comments, it looks at all records within the last two days in its current form.

The >= operator is only necessary if date is actually a datetime - if it's just a date type, = should suffice.

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Thanks. You wrote the solution as I was writing my own solution. (I use DATE(date) to get just the date part, though). –  Hope4You Mar 30 '12 at 19:21
    
@Hope4You - Cool! Just using = should be enough then, and actually more correct in case there were ever future dates in there. –  Paul Bellora Mar 30 '12 at 19:27
    
I just remembered now that using DATE(date) will stop indexes on row date from working. Would it work for me to use WHERE date >= CURDATE() even when date is DATETIME? Will it still only get rows from the very beginning of the day? –  Hope4You Apr 2 '12 at 18:10
    
@Hope4You - It should still work for you. I actually wrote the answer thinking date might be datetime. –  Paul Bellora Apr 2 '12 at 20:21

Here's the solution:

SELECT COUNT(entryID) FROM table WHERE DATE(date) >= CURDATE()

Since my date column is type DATETIME, I use DATE(date) to just get the date part, not the time part.

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This solution is very bad performance wise, it have to apply the function to every row in the table and compare after to the current date. With a big table it will arise performance problems. –  Jokin Oct 1 '13 at 13:39

CURDATE() returns a date like '2012-03-30', not a timestamp like '2012-03-30 21:38:17'. The subtraction of one day also returns just a date, not a timestamp. If you want to think of a date as a timestamp think of it as the beginning of that day, meaning a time of '00:00:00'.

And this is the reason, why this

WHERE date >= DATE_SUB(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 1 DAY)

and this

WHERE date > CURDATE()

do the same.

I have another hint: SELECT COUNT(entryID) and SELECT COUNT(*) give the same result. SELECT COUNT(*) gives the database-machine more posibilities to optimize counting, so COUNT(*) is often (not always) faster than COUNT(field).

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Good answer - I think you have the operators mixed up in your example though. –  Paul Bellora Mar 30 '12 at 19:41
    
Wouldn't SELECT COUNT(*) be slower since * means all rows? –  Hope4You Apr 2 '12 at 18:07

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