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Do I have to wrap all my IDisposable objects in using(){} statements, even if I'm just passing one to another? For example, in the following method:

public static string ReadResponse(HttpWebResponse response)
{
    string resp = null;
    using (Stream responseStream = response.GetResponseStream())
    {
        using (StreamReader responseReader = new StreamReader(responseStream))
        {
            resp = responseReader.ReadToEnd();
        }
    }
    return resp;
}

Could I consolidate this to just one using like this:

public static string ReadResponse(HttpWebResponse response)
{
    string resp = null;
    using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
    {
        resp = reader.ReadToEnd();
    }
    return resp;
}

Can I count on both the Stream and the StreamReader being disposed? Or do I have to use two using statements?

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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Yes, you can, but that's because the StreamReader constructor documentation specifically says: "The StreamReader object calls Dispose on the provided Stream object when StreamReader.Dispose is called."

If it didn't, then you could do something like this to at least clean up the code a bit.

using (Stream responseStream = response.GetResponseStream())
using (StreamReader responseReader = new StreamReader(responseStream))
{
    resp = responseReader.ReadToEnd();
}
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I love stacking usings, so much cleaner than the mass indentations :-) –  James Michael Hare Mar 30 '12 at 19:45
    
Think of the braces as being optional. The same way they are with any other statement such as an 'if' statement. It's valid code to write "if (expression) if (expression2) if (expression3) { /* Multiple lines of code.*/ }" where each if statement is nested inside the previous one. –  Trevor Elliott Mar 30 '12 at 19:50
    
@Moozhe It's not so much surprising that it compiles, it's more how VS handles the indentation. When you use brackets it tabs it in an extra level, when you do this it doesn't. If doing this tabbed it in a level I probably wouldn't even use it. –  Servy Mar 30 '12 at 20:02
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The person/code/layer that created the disposable object should in general be responsible for disposing the object. However there are scenarios you might have where this isn't the case and that is OK. It becomes an issue then of documentation.

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I found this question wider than simple question of using statement nesting, this is a pretty interesting application design problem.

Do I have to wrap all my IDisposable objects in using(){} statements, even if I'm just passing one to another?

Yes, since you are instantiating object which implements IDisposable - you are aware of disposing it, either by wrapping in using() or explicit Dispose() call.

Reason behind this is simple, imagine next scenario: you have following entities

  • TransportService
  • ReportService
  • FeedService

all implements IDisposable. Both ReportService and FeedService requires instance of TransportService to be passed in whilst construction stage. And question - is it correct disposing TransportService in the Dispose() of either ReportService or FeedService? No! Becuause the same instance of transport service could be passed in both services and once one of the disposes transport - this will affect all services as well.

public sealed class ReportService : IDisposable
{       
   private readonly ITransportService transportService;

   public ReportService(ITransportService transportService)
   {
       this.transportService = transportService;
   }

   public Dispose()
   {
      // ReportService should not dispose objects
      // passed in since they could be used by other classes as well
      // DO NOT: transportService.Dispose();
   }
}
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1  
It's not really a "always dispose" or "never dispose" question. There are two paths; when you pass a disposable object to another that you are no longer responsible for disposeing of it, and whatever they passed it to will make sure that it is disposed. That's what's happening here. When you pass a stream to a streamreader you're saying, "you deal with this stream". If you're giving a disposable object to someone else but saying, "I'm still responsible for disposing of this, it's scope is larger than yours" then what you pass it to doesn't even need to implement IDisposable. –  Servy Mar 30 '12 at 20:15
    
You'll see lots of examples of the latter with DataContexts. I might have a helper method/class that takes an instance of a DataContext and isn't even Disposable. it won't dispose of the DataContext, it knows that whoever handed it the DataContext will take care of cleaning it up and ensuring it isn't disposed while I'm still using it. –  Servy Mar 30 '12 at 20:16
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