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The tutorials, manuals and other resources I read about fork() usually only contain examples which could be solved much better with threads. They just communicate, do some very basic tasks, and communicate again to share or display the results. I have the feeling that unless your intention is starting a foreign program, (by having the father continuing and the child starting that foreign program), threads are always easier to handle, more flexible, and safer than forks.

Is there any other area of application when a fork() would be superior to just using threads? Except for a virus, that is.

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On some/many OSs, processes are cheaper than threads. –  ildjarn Mar 30 '12 at 20:24
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@ildjarn - cheaper? Since a process must have at least one thread to provide it with execution, how is that possible? –  Martin James Mar 30 '12 at 20:28
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@vsz: the hundred of megabytes of memory are kept shared in copy-on-write behind the scenes by any virtual memory manager. –  Matteo Italia Mar 30 '12 at 20:34
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fork() predates the various thread mechanisms by at least a decade. So, if you need portability to V7 UNIX, fork() is a much better choice. –  Robᵩ Mar 30 '12 at 20:35
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One typical example would be a web server (e.g., Apache). If a process crashes, it's easy to restart cleanly -- not so with threads. Using separate processes limits the damage you can get from a single process crashing. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 30 '12 at 20:36

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use fork() as a simple way to generate a snapshot from an application without stopping the original application.

Since the OS maps the process's virtual memory as copy on write, you don't really pay any cost except for data that has changed (plus OS overhead).

Edit: Added answers from comments for the sake of later viewers.

One typical example would be a web server (e.g., Apache). If a process crashes, it's easy to restart cleanly -- not so with threads. Using separate processes limits the damage you can get from a single process crashing. – Jerry Coffin

fork() predates the various thread mechanisms by at least a decade. So, if you need portability to V7 UNIX, fork() is a much better choice. – Robᵩ

fork() can be used to daemonize your process while keeping the monitor process alive. – Mark B

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What use does this have besides debugging? A very lengthy self-diagnostic function which takes a lot of time and should not keep the program hanging? –  vsz Mar 30 '12 at 20:39
    
@vsz, snapshots aren't just for debugging. I use them all the time so that I can cache the results of a 9 hour process. –  MSN Mar 31 '12 at 0:24

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