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Python list confusion

I am newbie to python. Please let me know why do stairlist[1][0] = 2 statement changes all the values when initialized with stairlist = [[0,0]] * 8.

>>> stairlist = [[0,0]] * 8
>>> stairlist
[[0, 0], [0, 0], [0, 0], [0, 0], [0, 0], [0, 0], [0, 0], [0, 0]]
>>> stairlist[1][0] = 2
>>> stairlist
[[2, 0], [2, 0], [2, 0], [2, 0], [2, 0], [2, 0], [2, 0], [2, 0]]

But when I initialize stairlist variable according to the following then it works fine.

>>> stairlist = [[1,2],[1,2]]
>>> stairlist
[[1, 2], [1, 2]]
>>> stairlist[1][1] = 3
>>> stairlist
[[1, 2], [1, 3]]
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marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, agf, DSM, Adam Rosenfield, ypercube Mar 30 '12 at 20:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Looks like the [[0,0]] * 8 syntax is using aliases instead of independent copies. Not sure whether this is in the spec, or is an implementation issue. –  jpm Mar 30 '12 at 20:33
    
@FelixKling, Good spot. –  jpm Mar 30 '12 at 20:34
    
@jpm: Yes, it's in the spec. It's called sequence repetition. See docs.python.org/library/… note (2), and notice that the copies are defined to be shallow copies. –  Adam Rosenfield Mar 30 '12 at 20:39
    
@FelixKling Thanks, I found the solution. Actually it was difficult for me to find the similar question due to question title problem. –  Sushant Jain Mar 30 '12 at 20:41

1 Answer 1

array * number will create a new array by making a shallow copy of each object in the original array, number times.

since [0,0] is itself an array, and thus a proper object, the new array just contains a bunch of references to the same [0,0] array. when you change one, you change all of them.

for comparison:

simplelist = [0] * 8
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
simplelist[1] = 2
[0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean "and thus a proper object"? An int is a proper object. Also, the type is called a list. Since this isn't true for all arrays in general, you need to be specific. What exactly is your example trying to show? You're not doing the same thing he was. If he were to do stairlist[1] = 2 he'd get the exact same behavior. –  agf Mar 30 '12 at 20:44

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