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I managed to run cvs2git several months ago and created a git repository for some code. I imported from cvs into a dedicated server that I want to use as a remote repository.

Today, for the first time, I tried cloning from the remote repository, and was able to successfully clone. However, when I tried to push changes back up to the remote repository, it seems like it's not bare because I get the error:

remote: error: refusing to update checked out branch: refs/heads/master
remote: error: By default, updating the current branch in a non-bare repository
remote: error: is denied, because it will make the index and work tree inconsistent
remote: error: with what you pushed, and will require 'git reset --hard' to match
remote: error: the work tree to HEAD.
remote: error:
remote: error: You can set 'receive.denyCurrentBranch' configuration variable to
remote: error: 'ignore' or 'warn' in the remote repository to allow pushing into
remote: error: its current branch; however, this is not recommended unless you
remote: error: arranged to update its work tree to match what you pushed in some
remote: error: other way.
remote: error:
remote: error: To squelch this message and still keep the default behaviour, set
remote: error: 'receive.denyCurrentBranch' configuration variable to 'refuse'.

After researching it, I think the problem is that the repository I created with cvs2git is not bare.

So how can I push changes to this remote repository? My (limited) understanding of git is that every clone is equal to each other, and there's nothing particularly "special" about the copy that is located on the remote repository. So can I delete what is currently there, create a fresh bare repository, and push from my remote client back up to the remote repository?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So can I delete what is currently there, create a fresh bare repository, and push from my remote client back up to the remote repository?

Yes, you can do that - in fact, it'd probably be the simplest way.

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