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I understand it's off topic, I couldn't find anywhere online and I was thinking maybe programming gurus in the community might know this.
I usually use

kill -9 pid

to kill the job. I always wondered the origin of 9. I looked it up online, and it says

"9 Means KILL signal that is not catchable or ignorable. In other words it would signal process (some running application) to quit immediately" (source: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_does_kill_-9_do_in_unix_in_its_entirety)

But, why 9? and what about the other numbers? is there any historical significance or because of the architecture of Unix?

Thanks!

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1  
I think, that this question better belongs to superuser.com –  Rafał Rawicki Mar 30 '12 at 23:30

8 Answers 8

up vote 21 down vote accepted

See the wikipedia article on Unix signals for the list of other signals. SIGKILL just happened to get the number 9.

You can as well use the mnemonics, as the numbers:

kill -SIGKILL pid
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Back in the day (by which I mean 4.xBSD or so) you couldn't use the mnemonics with the shell command, which is why the number 9 is written into an awful lot of old dusty-deck shell scripts. –  zwol Mar 30 '12 at 23:33

There were 8 other signals they came up with first.

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Really? A downvote for the only answer that actually answers the question? –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 11 '14 at 3:16

I think a better answer here is simply this:

mike@sleepycat:~☺  kill -l
 1) SIGHUP   2) SIGINT   3) SIGQUIT  4) SIGILL   5) SIGTRAP  
 6) SIGABRT  7) SIGBUS   8) SIGFPE   9) SIGKILL 10) SIGUSR1
11) SIGSEGV 12) SIGUSR2 13) SIGPIPE 14) SIGALRM 15) SIGTERM
16) SIGSTKFLT   17) SIGCHLD 18) SIGCONT 19) SIGSTOP 20) SIGTSTP
21) SIGTTIN 22) SIGTTOU 23) SIGURG  24) SIGXCPU 25) SIGXFSZ
26) SIGVTALRM   27) SIGPROF 28) SIGWINCH    29) SIGIO   30) SIGPWR
31) SIGSYS  34) SIGRTMIN    35) SIGRTMIN+1  36) SIGRTMIN+2  37) SIGRTMIN+3
38) SIGRTMIN+4  39) SIGRTMIN+5  40) SIGRTMIN+6  41) SIGRTMIN+7  42) SIGRTMIN+8
43) SIGRTMIN+9  44) SIGRTMIN+10 45) SIGRTMIN+11 46) SIGRTMIN+12 47) SIGRTMIN+13
48) SIGRTMIN+14 49) SIGRTMIN+15 50) SIGRTMAX-14 51) SIGRTMAX-13 52) SIGRTMAX-12
53) SIGRTMAX-11 54) SIGRTMAX-10 55) SIGRTMAX-9  56) SIGRTMAX-8  57) SIGRTMAX-7
58) SIGRTMAX-6  59) SIGRTMAX-5  60) SIGRTMAX-4  61) SIGRTMAX-3  62) SIGRTMAX-2
63) SIGRTMAX-1  64) SIGRTMAX    

As for the "significance" of 9... I would say there is probably none. According to The Linux Programming Interface(p 388):

Each signal is defined as a unique (small) integer, starting sequentially from 1. These integers are defined in with symbolic names of the form SIGxxxx . Since the actual numbers used for each signal vary across implementations, it is these symbolic names that are always used in programs.

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There’s a very long list of Unix signals, which you can view on Wikipedia. Somewhat confusingly, you can actually use kill to send any signal to a process. For instance, kill -SIGSTOP 12345 forces process 12345 to pause its execution, while kill -SIGCONT 12345 tells it to resume. A slightly less cryptic version of kill -9 is kill -SIGKILL.

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The underlying system call that sends signals is also called kill. Probably because the default behavior for most of the original set of signals (numbers 1 through 15) was to terminate the process. –  zwol Mar 30 '12 at 23:34

It's a reference to "Revoulution 9" by the Beatles. A collection of strung together sound clips and found noises, this recording features John Lennon repeating over and over "Number 9, Number 9..." Further, this song drew further attention in 1969 when it was discovered that when played backwards, John seemed to be saying "Turn me on, dead man..."

Therefore the ninth signal was destined to be the deadliest of the kill signals.

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8  
Really can't tell if you're pulling this out of your ass, or if there's a chance that it's true. –  Jonathon Reinhart Apr 8 '13 at 16:34
    
Could be both :) –  Stairbob Aug 12 '13 at 20:51
    
The end of that topic truly is epic, particularly the two comments before mine. I also stumbled upon that article about kill and which sequence to use: pthree.org/2012/08/14/appropriate-use-of-kill-9-pid –  Gull_Code Feb 5 '14 at 9:14

I don't think there is any significance to number 9. In addition, despite common believe, kill is used not only to kill processes but also send a signal to a process. If you are really curious you can read here and here.

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First you need to know what are Signals in Unix-like systems (It'll take just few minutes).

Signals, are software interrupts sent to a (running) program to indicate that an important event has occurred.

The events can vary from user requests to illegal memory access errors. Some signals, such as the interrupt signal, indicate that a user has asked the program to do something that is not in the usual flow of control.

There are several types of Signals we can use - to get a full list of all the available/possible Signals use "$ kill -l" command: enter image description here

In the above output it's clearly visible, that each Signal has a 'signal number' (e.g. 1, 2, 3) and a 'signal name' (e.g. SIGUP, SIGINT, SIGQUIT) associated with it. For a detailed look up what each and every Signal does, visit this link.

Finally, coming to the question "Why number 9 in kill -9 command":

There are several methods of delivering signals to a program or script. One of commonly used method for sending signal is to use the kill command - the basic syntax is:

$ kill -signal pid

Where signal is either the number or name of the signal, followed by the process Id (pid) to which the signal will be sent.

For example - -SIGKILL (or -9), signal kills the process immediately.

$ kill -SIGKILL 1001

and

$ kill -9 1001

both command are one the same thing i.e. above we have used the 'signal name', and later we have used 'signal number'.

Verdict: One has an open choice to whether use the 'signal name' or 'signal number' with the kill command.

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Both are same as kill -sigkill processID, kill -9 processID. Its basically for forced termination of the process.

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