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I'm wanting to run AJAX to get some URL data, build an object from the data and assign it to a global object variable. So I know I need to run a synchronous ajax request. (Right?) Well I also want to make use of the beforeSend setting to give my users a loading screen. (I probably should be asking first, is beforeSend the only way to achieve that?) How might I combine the benefits sync and async?

async:

$.ajax({
        url:'scripts/scripts.php?call=page&url='+thisurl, /*local*/
        dataType:'html',
        beforeSend:function(){
            $('#display').html('<div class="loading"></div>');
        },
        success:function(data, textStatus, jqXHR){
            /*local*/ myobj = getMyObj(data); $('#display').html(myobj);
        },
        error:function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown){ }
});

sync:

$.ajax({
        url:'scripts/scripts.php?call=page&url='+thisurl, /*local*/
        dataType:'html',
        async:false,
        success:function(data, textStatus, jqXHR){
            /*global*/ myobj = getMyObj(data);
        }
});
$('#display').html(myobj);

sorry if this doesn't make sense

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How about using a web worker if HTML5 is a variant? –  Bakudan Mar 31 '12 at 1:37
    
Wow, they have those?!... I thought it would be cool if there was. Programmers have thought of everything. I will research that. Now is it only an HTML5 thing? –  philtune Mar 31 '12 at 1:40
    
Yes it is, so IE is limited to version 10. But the other browsers seems to be ok, in their latest versions. You can make things future ready, by using it and adding a fallback with a regular jQuery solution. –  Bakudan Mar 31 '12 at 1:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ehm, well, it's pretty obvious that if you want to display something before a synchronous ajax function you do:

$('#display').html('<div class="loading"></div>');
$.ajax({
        url:'scripts/scripts.php?call=page&url='+thisurl, /*local*/
        dataType:'html',
        async:false,
        success:function(data, textStatus, jqXHR){
            /*global*/ myobj = getMyObj(data);
        }
});
$('#display').html(myobj);

On the other hand why use a synchronous Ajax function, it's a really bad idea, use promises instead, or something like:

var Ajax = $.ajax({
              url:'scripts/scripts.php?call=page&url='+thisurl,
              dataType:'html'
           });

//do something later
$("#mybutton").on('click', function() {
    Ajax.done(function(data) {         //if/when the ajax function is completed
        $('#display').html(data);
    });
});        

Or stick the ajax in a seperate function and run that the same way, there are many options other than synchronous Ajax calls!

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Okay, I've never seen that one before (.done)... I actually think that's exactly what I wanted. Reasoning behind doing synchronous is I want to save page loads to a global variable and only run ajax if I don't already have data for that page. I got the idea from Gmail, how you can view messages that you've already looked at without having to run a new thread. I assume gmail just saves data onto a global variable and recalls it if it's already been looked at. –  philtune Mar 31 '12 at 1:52
    
where might i find documentation on that (.done, .fail, .always)? I can only find references to it on the .ajax() doc. –  philtune Mar 31 '12 at 1:55
    
gmail uses SPDY (speedy), Google's own websockets-like implementation. done(), fail() and always() will work in newer versions of jQuery on $.ajax, and $.post is just a shortcut for an $.ajax function. –  adeneo Mar 31 '12 at 2:01
    
So if I understand correctly, I can run an async function then call .done to send the data to a global variable? –  philtune Mar 31 '12 at 2:04
    
Yes, you could, but you could also store the ajax function in a variable, like above, and just use that variable instead, preferably in some other namespace then window (global), and you could even check to see if the variable exist and just run the ajax function if it does'nt. There are also promises, like when(), then() etc. –  adeneo Mar 31 '12 at 2:07

Chances are you don't really want to do a synchronous AJAX request. From the jQuery.ajax documentation:

Note that synchronous requests may temporarily lock the browser, disabling any actions while the request is active

A better practice is to make an async request and put up a spinner to let the user know you are retrieving data for them.

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