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What are the differences in compilability or generated code (if any) between the following two source files:

Exhibit A:

namespace std {};
using namespace std;
#include <vector>
#include <string>

<any code here>

Exhibit B:

#include <vector>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

<any code here>

Assuming the two <any code here> placeholders are replaced with any identical user code.

Put another way: Is there any user visible difference if "using namespace std;" is put before the standard #includes (assuming namespace std has been introduced as above)?

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2  
I'm curious as to why you asked this. –  Pubby Mar 31 '12 at 2:45
    
First off, "Exhibit A" is illegal in C++: you are not allowed to re-open the std namespace. –  André Caron Mar 31 '12 at 3:37
    
@AndréCaron: Do you have a standard reference for that? –  Andrew Tomazos Mar 31 '12 at 3:55
    
@user1131467: Unfortunately not. I remember getting that from "The C++ Programming Language" by Bjarne Stroustrup, but I can't find a suitable reference at the moment. –  André Caron Mar 31 '12 at 6:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As unlikely as it may be, the following code could possibly be in your implementation's vector header:

namespace __AA
{
    class vector {};
}

namespace std
{
    // actual std::vector implementation here
}

namespace __BB
{
    using namespace __AA;
    vector x;
}

Now with Exhibit A, you've got an ambiguity.

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In any practical standard library implementation there will be no difference whatsoever, since the using directive will have no impact on definitions inside of namespace std (as std is already the current scope).

If any standard library implementation were negatively affected either way, I would consider it a serious quality-of-implementation defect.

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