Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on problem 9 in Project Euler:

There exists exactly one Pythagorean triplet for which a + b + c = 1000. Find the product abc.

The following code I wrote uses Euclid's formula for generating primes. For some reason my code returns "0" as an answer; even though the variable values are correct for the first few loops. Since the problem is pretty easy, some parts of the code aren't perfectly optimized; I don't think that should matter. The code is as follows:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int placeholder;    //for cin at the end so console stays open
    int a, b, c, m, n, k;
    a = 0;  b = 0;  c = 0;
    m = 0;  n = 0;  k = 0;  //to prevent initialization warnings
    int sum = 0;
    int product = 0;

    /*We will use Euclid's (or Euler's?) formula for generating primitive
     *Pythagorean triples (a^2 + b^2 = c^2): For any "m" and "n",
     *a = m^2 - n^2 ; b = 2mn ; c = m^2 + n^2 . We will then cycle through
     *values of a scalar/constant "k", to make sure we didn't miss anything.
     */

    //these following loops will increment m, n, and k,
    //and see if a+b+c is 1000. If so, all loops will break.
    for (int iii = 1; m < 1000; iii++)
    {
        m = iii;
        for (int ii = 1; n < 1000; ii++)
        {
            n = ii;
            for (int i = 1; k <=1000; i++)
            {
                sum = 0;
                k = i;
                a = (m*m - n*n)*k;
                b = (2*m*n)*k;
                c = (m*m + n*n)*k;
                if (sum == 1000) break;
            }
            if (sum == 1000) break;
        }
        if (sum == 1000) break;
    }
    product = a * b * c;

    cout << "The product abc of the Pythagorean triplet for which a+b+c = 1000 is:\n";
    cout << product << endl;
    cin >> placeholder;
    return 0;
}

And also, is there a better way to break out of multiple loops without using "break", or is "break" optimal?


Here's the updated code, with only the changes:

for (m = 2; m < 1000; m++)
    {
        for (int n = 2; n < 1000; n++)
        {
            for (k = 2; (k < 1000) && (m > n); k++)
            {
                sum = 0;
                a = (m*m - n*n)*k;
                b = (2*m*n)*k;
                c = (m*m + n*n)*k;
                sum = a + b + c;
                if ((sum == 1000) && (!(k==0))) break;
            }

It still doesn't work though (now gives "1621787660" as an answer). I know, a lot of parentheses.

share|improve this question
    
Is there any particular reason you're using the (somewhat confusing) i, ii, and iii variables instead of just using m, n, and k as loop variables directly? –  Taymon Mar 31 '12 at 2:59
1  
1) m+n should be odd, 2) m > n 3)m and n are coprimes. :\ Check these first. :| –  st0le Mar 31 '12 at 3:10
    
No reason, other than to confuse myself... Fixed in the edit. –  Ernest3.14 Mar 31 '12 at 3:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The new problem is that the solution occurs for k = 1, so starting your k at 2 misses the answer outright.

Instead of looping through different k values, you can just check for when the current sum divides 1000 evenly. Here's what I mean (using the discussed goto statement):

      for (n = 2; n < 1000; n++)
        {
          for (m = n + 1; m < 1000; m++)
            {
              sum = 0;
              a = (m*m - n*n);
              b = (2*m*n);
              c = (m*m + n*n);
              sum = a + b + c;
              if(1000 % sum == 0)
                {
                  int k = 1000 / sum;
                  a *= k;
                  b *= k;
                  c *= k;
                  goto done;
                }
            }
        }
     done:
      product = a * b * c;

I also switched around the two for loops so that you can just initialize m as being larger than n instead of checking every iteration.

Note that with this new method, the solution doesn't occur for k = 1 (just a difference in how the loops are run, this isn't a problem)

share|improve this answer

Presumably sum is supposed to be a + b + c. However, nowhere in your code do you actually do this, which is presumably your problem.

To answer the final question: Yes, you can use a goto. Breaking out of multiple nested loops is one of the rare occasions when it isn't considered harmful.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I was really scared of doing that, since there's so much out there against using 'goto'. –  Ernest3.14 Mar 31 '12 at 2:59
    
Figured out the first part, see revised answer. –  Taymon Mar 31 '12 at 3:03
    
Heh, I really am intelligent. I hate it when I take something out to debug, only to forget to put it in later. –  Ernest3.14 Mar 31 '12 at 3:11
2  
I would suggest that the deprecation of goto is largely outdated. This is not to say that one should especially seek excuses to use goto during typical coding, but goto earned its bad name fully forty years ago. It was another time, another context, in which other problems were current. Frankly, with the facilities modern compilers offer, so long as your program is reasonably well modularized, there just isn't much temptation to misuse goto. The occasion for its use doesn't arise often (even less than the occasion for continue) but, when it does, just use it. It's all right. –  thb Mar 31 '12 at 3:39
    
goto is the Swiss Army knife of flow control instructions. When paired with if (and a label), it can emulate every other control structure in the language except possibly return. But consider that a Swiss army knife makes a crappy saw, a substandard screwdriver, and not even that good a knife. Basically, you'd only use it when you have nothing better to use. Likewise, goto is substandard for any case where you have other, more specialized constructs that are made for the job. But when you need it, and nothing else will do, that's what it's there for. –  cHao Mar 31 '12 at 5:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.