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I really just want to do something like

x <- as.integer(c(1,2,3))

But because c(1,2,3) is stored as a floating point vector I'm worried that I'll have problems with truncation, such as

> as.integer(1.99999999999)
[1] 1

How do I know I'm safe?

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1  
I worry sometimes too. See also stackoverflow.com/q/6155643/210673 –  Aaron Mar 31 '12 at 12:01
    
@Aaron great thanks! And thanks for the spelling correction. I truncated truncation :) –  Xu Wang Mar 31 '12 at 16:45
    
Glad you found the link helpful, though the spelling correction was @Tomas. –  Aaron Mar 31 '12 at 18:53
    
@Aaron ah, then thanks to you and Tomas as well –  Xu Wang Apr 1 '12 at 0:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

you can use a suffix L:

> x <- c(1L, 2L, 3L)
> is.integer(x)
[1] TRUE

> x <- 1L:3L
> x
[1] 1 2 3
> is.integer(x)
[1] TRUE

Or if you already have a numeric vector and convert it into integer, you can explicitly describe the rule:

> x <- c(-0.01, 1.999, 2, 3.000001)
> as.integer(round(x))
[1] 0 2 2 3
> as.integer(floor(x))
[1] -1  1  2  3
> as.integer(trunc(x))
[1] 0 1 2 3
> as.integer(ceiling(x))
[1] 0 2 2 4
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As you show, round and company return floating point numbers so need to be coerced to integer. Is there any need to worry about that coercion doing something unexpected? –  Aaron Apr 1 '12 at 1:42
    
What kind of unexpected behavior you think of? –  kohske Apr 2 '12 at 9:51
    
Same as above, truncation. Could the result from round and the others ever be stored as 1.999999999 (or the binary equivalent) so as.integer would return 1 instead of 2? –  Aaron Apr 2 '12 at 11:57
    
you can find the implementations here: svn.r-project.org/R/trunk/src/nmath/fround.c svn.r-project.org/R/trunk/src/main/arithmetic.c I think you don't need to worry about that. –  kohske Apr 2 '12 at 19:42

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