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I want to PUT to rails and avoid getting a 204. I am using this pattern:

class SomeController < ApplicationController
  respond_to :json

  def update
    # ...
    respond_with(some_object)
  end
end

However, when I do a put to update, I get a 204 back. I realize this is completely valid etc, but I explicitly want the content back. I can override it to some extent like this:

def update
  respond_with(some_object) do |format|
    format.json{render json: some_object}
  end
end

but this seems a bit too hands-on for rails. Is there any more idiomatic way of avoiding a 204 and requesting the full content to be sent back? This is Rails 3.2.

In summary: I want maximally idiomatic rails that avoids a 204.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

I made a custom responder which always returns my JSON encoded resource even on PUT/POST.

I put this file in lib/responders/json_responder.rb. Your /lib dir should be autoloaded.

module Responders::JsonResponder
  protected

  # simply render the resource even on POST instead of redirecting for ajax
  def api_behavior(error)
    if post?
      display resource, :status => :created
    # render resource instead of 204 no content
    elsif put?
      display resource, :status => :ok
    else
      super
    end
  end
end

Now, explicitly modify the controller which requires this behavior, or place it in the application controller.

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base

  protect_from_forgery

  responders :json

end

You should now get JSON encoded resources back on PUT.

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5  
I would add that you need the 'responders' gem to be able to use the responders method in your controller. –  iterion Jul 9 '12 at 5:49

This behavior seems intentional to fall in line with the HTTP spec, and "ideally" you should be firing off an additional GET request to see the results. However, I agree in the real world I'd rather have it return the JSON.

@jpfuentes2's solution above should do the trick (it's very similar to the pull request below), but I'm hesitant to apply anything that's patching rails internals, as it could be a real pain to upgrade between major versions, especially if you don't have tests for it (and let's face it, developers often skimp on controller tests).

References

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What's wrong with simply doing:

def update
  some_object = SomeObject.update()
  render json: some_object
end
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1  
You won't get proper http response codes or errors back –  Brad Reid Apr 29 '14 at 22:27

Just to clarify, you do not need the responders gem to do this... You can just do:

config/initializers/responder_with_put_content.rb

class ResponderWithPutContent < ActionController::Responder
  def api_behavior(*args, &block)
    if put?
      display resource, :status => :ok
    else
      super
    end
  end
end

and then either (for all updates actions to be affected):

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  def self.responder
    ResponderWithPutContent
  end
end

or in your action:

def update
  foo = Foo.find(params[:id])
  foo.update_attributes(params[:foo])
  respond_with foo, responder: ResponderWithPutContent
end
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