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I have built an app that works only when not run as a Windows service. Well, the service runs, but it doesn't do what it should. The service uses the Local Service account. So to kick off debugging, I thought I'd start with something simple: have it create a directory when it starts:

Directory.CreateDirectory(
    Environment.SpecialFolder.LocalApplicationData + "\\MyService");

When I started the service, it stopped almost immediately and Windows reported that fact. When I commented out the above statement, recompiled and re-installed, the service ran without stopping.

Obviously the above line throws an exception of some sort. I have no way of logging the error because I can't write to the file system. Any ideas why Local Service can't create a directory in its own %LOCALAPPDATA%?

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3  
Kinda sad that this code compiles :( –  Hans Passant Mar 31 '12 at 9:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You should use GetFolderPath with LocalApplicationData like so:

string folderName = Path.Combine(Environment.GetFolderPath(
    Environment.SpecialFolder.LocalApplicationData), 
    "MyService");

Directory.CreateDirectory(folderName)
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1  
+ 1 Beat me to it :0) –  Tung Mar 31 '12 at 8:57
1  
I feel so dumb now. I'll give it a whirl... –  Steve Taylor Mar 31 '12 at 8:58
    
Thanks. The directory C:\Windows\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Local\MyService was created. Now I can get on with logging. –  Steve Taylor Mar 31 '12 at 9:07
    
Glad I could help. –  BluesRockAddict Mar 31 '12 at 9:12

I think this might be because there is no special folder. When running as the local service account you are running under that user, not the logged in user. so you are requesting a special folder that probably wont exist, as I don't think the local service has a profile. (I may be wrong) - I was wrong :p

Just in case anyone pops by:

C:\Windows\ServiceProfiles\LocalService

is the local service profile folder, so it will end up in there.

If you want to debug it surround that line with a try catch, and then write the error to a file:

try
{
    Directory.CreateDirectory(Environment.SpecialFolder.LocalApplicationData + "\\MyService");
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    System.IO.StreamWriter file = new System.IO.StreamWriter(@"C:\MyServicelog.txt",true);
    file.WriteLine(ex.Message);
    file.Close();
}

At least then you can see whats causing the error

Martyn

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+1 it most likely doesn't have a profile. –  ta.speot.is Mar 31 '12 at 9:01

I suggest you write the exception details to the event log. All user accounts have permission to write to the event log as long as the log and source names have already been created by an administrator (which you can do simply by running the app as yourself first).

As to the root cause of the error, it may be because LocalService doesn't normally get a full set of profile folders created by default. I'm not sure whether this is by design, or simply what I have observed on various machines.

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Thanks. I'll try the event log. My understanding is that (at least on Windows 7) %LOCALAPPDATA% for Local Service is C:\Windows\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Local. –  Steve Taylor Mar 31 '12 at 8:56

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