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I'm using the pimpl-idiom with std::unique_ptr:

class window {
  window(const rectangle& rect);

private:
  class window_impl; // defined elsewhere
  std::unique_ptr<window_impl> impl_; // won't compile
};

However, I get a compile error regarding the use of an incomplete type, on line 304 in <memory>:

Invalid application of 'sizeof' to an incomplete type 'uixx::window::window_impl'

For as far as I know, std::unique_ptr should be able to be used with an incomplete type. Is this a bug in libc++ or am I doing something wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
Post complete code please. Especially template constructors. – Alexandre C. Mar 31 '12 at 9:04
    
@daknok_t: The boost smart pointer library forbid boost::unique_ptr from working with incomplete types: you had to use boost::shared_ptr instead. Are you sure that the C++ standard library doesn't have the same restriction? – Hurkyl Mar 31 '12 at 9:07
3  
@Alexandre: the code that the OP posted is complete code for this use case. A file consisting only of #include <memory> and those two lines should compile... assuming unique_ptr is allowed to be used with incomplete types. – Hurkyl Mar 31 '12 at 9:08
2  
@Hurkyl: if those two lines were at class scope, this would be OK, provided the destructor is defined where window_impl is complete. This is why I ask. Here, of course this won't work since at this point the destructor of window_impl is not known. – Alexandre C. Mar 31 '12 at 9:11
    
@Alexandre C. I made clear now that both lines are in a class definition. – user1203803 Mar 31 '12 at 9:18
up vote 92 down vote accepted

Here are some examples of std::unique_ptr with incomplete types. The problem lies in destruction.

If you use pimpl with unique_ptr, you need to declare a destructor:

class foo
{ 
    class impl;
    std::unique_ptr<impl> impl_;

public:
    foo(); // You may need a def. constructor to be defined elsewhere

    ~foo(); // Implement (with an empty body) where impl is complete
};

because otherwise the compiler generates a default one, and it needs a complete declaration of foo::impl for this.

If you have template constructors, then you're screwed, even if you don't construct the impl_ member:

template <typename T>
foo::foo(T bar) 
{
    // Here the compiler needs to know how to
    // destroy impl_ in case an exception is
    // thrown !
}

At namespace scope, using unique_ptr will not work either:

class impl;
std::unique_ptr<impl> impl_;

since the compiler must know here how to destroy this static duration object. A workaround is:

class impl;
struct ptr_impl : std::unique_ptr<impl>
{
    ~ptr_impl(); // Implement (empty body) elsewhere
} impl_;
share|improve this answer
2  
I find your first solution (adding the foo destructor) allows the class declaration itself to compile, but declaring an object of that type anywhere results in the original error ("invalid application of 'sizeof'..."). – Jeff Trull Sep 30 '12 at 19:45
    
@user192737: Can you please post a complete example somewhere reproducing the error (pastebin or ideone or whatever) ? – Alexandre C. Sep 30 '12 at 19:49
    
Sure! It's just your first example, with a main() in which the class is instantiated: pastebin.com/65jMYzsi I have subsequently found that adding a default constructor to foo makes the error go away - I'm not sure why. – Jeff Trull Sep 30 '12 at 19:59
    
@user192737: When the default constructor is generated, impl is not complete, and trying to construct a unique_ptr with an incomplete type is what gave you the error too. Thanks for this, I'll update the answer. – Alexandre C. Sep 30 '12 at 20:13
6  
excellent answer, just to note; we can still use the default constructor/destructor by placing e.g. foo::~foo() = default; in the src file – assem Jan 19 '14 at 6:29

As Alexandre C. mentioned, the problem comes down to window's destructor being implicitly defined in places where the type of window_impl is still incomplete. In addition to his solutions, another workaround that I've used is to declare a Deleter functor in the header:

// Foo.h

class FooImpl;
struct FooImplDeleter
{
  void operator()(FooImpl *p);
}

class Foo
{
...
private:
  std::unique_ptr<FooImpl, FooImplDeleter> impl_;
};

// Foo.cpp

...
void FooImplDeleter::operator()(FooImpl *p)
{
  delete p;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the correct solution as far as I'm concerned. It isn't unique to using the pimpl-idiom, it's a general problem with using std::unique_ptr with incomplete classes. The default deleter used by std::unique_ptr<X> attempts to do "delete X", which it can't do if X is a forward declaration. By specifying a deleter function, you can put that function in a source file where the class X is completely defined. Other source files can then use std::unique_ptr<X, DeleterFunc> even though X is just a forward declaration as long as they are linked with the source file containing DeleterFunc. – sheltond Jan 6 at 14:34

Probably you have some function bodies within .h file within class that uses incomplete type.

Make sure that within your .h for class window you have only function declaration. All function bodies for window must be in .cpp file. And for window_impl as well...

Btw, you have to explicitly add destructor declaration for windows class in your .h file.

But you CANNOT put empty dtor body in you header file:

class window {
    virtual ~window() {};
  }

Must be just a declaration:

  class window {
    virtual ~window();
  }
share|improve this answer

use a custom deleter

The problem is that unique_ptr<T> must call the destructor T::~T() in its own destructor, its move assignment operator, and unique_ptr::reset() member function (only). However, these must be called (implicitly or explicitly) in several PIMPL situations (already in the outer class's destructor and move assignment operator).

As already pointed out in another answer, one way to avoid that is to move all operations that require unique_ptr::~unique_ptr(), unique_ptr::operator=(unique_ptr&&), and unique_ptr::reset() into the source file where the pimpl helper class is actually defined.

However, this is rather inconvenient and defies the very point of the pimpl idoim to some degree. A much cleaner solution that avoids all that is to use a custom deleter and only move its definition into the source file where the pimple helper class lives. Here is a simple example:

// file.h
class foo
{
  struct pimpl;
  struct pimpl_deleter { void operator()(pimpl*) const; };
  std::unique_ptr<pimpl,pimpl_deleter> _pimpl;
public:
  foo(some data);
  foo(foo&&) = default;             // no need to define this in file.cc
  foo&operator=(foo&&) = default    // no need to define this in file.cc
//foo::~foo()          auto-generated: no need to define this in file.cc
};

// file.cc
struct foo::pimpl
{
  // lots of complicated code
};
void foo::pimpl_deleter::operator()(foo::pimpl*ptr) const { delete ptr; }

Instead of a separate deleter class, you can also use a free function or static member of foo in conjunction with a lambda:

class foo {
  struct pimpl;
  static void delete_pimpl(pimpl*);
  std::unique_ptr<pimpl,[](pimpl*p){delete_pimpl(p);}> _pimpl;
};
share|improve this answer

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