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I have a client site that had a singular code base. On my recent changes, I took the live copy of the website and committed it to a new GIT repository and started to do new updates to it. Now there is another developer has has made changes to the live site, so I would like to do something that would allow me to treat his changes like another branch or something and merge the differences in smoothly. What would be a proper approach to doing this? I've considered addign the code to a new branch, and also creating a diff patch and applying it to the GIT code as well.

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3 Answers 3

I'm assuming you did something like the following:

git init project
cd project
<copy existing code to this directory>
git add -Af .
git commit -m "Import code"
<edited some files>
git commit -a -m "Made changes"

The best approach is to create a branch off of the original import commit and make another snapshot of the live site in that branch. Suppose the original import commit has a commit ID of f00ba4 (you can use git log to find out the actual SHA1 ID). To incorporate the other developer's changes, you can do the following:

  1. Create a new branch called live pointing to commit f00ba4, then check it out:

    git checkout -b live f00ba4
    
  2. Make sure there are no untracked files lying around:

    git clean -dxf
    
  3. Copy the latest code from the live site

  4. Commit the latest code:

    git add -Af .
    git commit -m "take another snapshot of the live site"
    
  5. Switch back to your branch:

    git checkout master
    
  6. Incorporate the other developer's changes with your changes:

    git merge live
    

Each time the other developer modifies the files in the live site, you can update your repository as follows:

  1. Update the live branch with the latest code:

    git checkout live
    git clean -dxf
    <copy the files from the live site>
    git add -Af .
    git commit -m "another snapshot of the live site"
    
  2. Merge the changes to live into master:

    git checkout master
    git merge live
    

When you're ready to deploy your changes:

  1. Make sure the live branch is up to date:

    git checkout live
    git clean -dxf
    <copy the files from the live site>
    git add -Af .
    git commit -m "another snapshot of the live site"
    
  2. Merge your changes into live:

    git merge master
    
  3. Deploy the files to the live site

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Making another branch and then submitting his changes would be a good way to do it.

A better method would be to get that other developer on a his own git branch and then just integrate between each other.

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I plan to set that up for later. Our current codebase was done with changes that we would FTP to the server. When I started the GIT repo, he has pushed some changes via FTP since I started messing with my initial code clone, so I have to add those changes in and get him setup. –  Joel Larson Mar 31 '12 at 19:36

Branching is the normal approach in Git. That means: branch from your current code, do the merge there and when succesful, merge it back into the main branch.

Branching is not something that deviates from the ordinary (such as in SVN) but it's part of the normal workflow in Git. No need to have that developer's edit interfere with your work: just merge separately and then merge back into the main branch.

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