Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I sometimes notice programs that crash on my computer with the error: "pure virtual function call".

How do these programs even compile when an object cannot be created of an abstract class?

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 54 down vote accepted

They can result if you try to make a virtual function call from a constructor or destructor. Since you can't make a virtual function call from a constructor or destructor (the derived class object hasn't been constructed or has already been destroyed), it calls the base class version, which in the case of a pure virtual function, doesn't exist.

class Base
{
public:
    Base() { doIt(); }  // DON'T DO THIS
    virtual void doIt() = 0;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
    void doIt() {}
};

int main(void)
{
    Derived d;  // This will cause "pure virtual function call" error
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Any reason why the compiler couldn't catch this, in general? –  Thomas Sep 19 '08 at 4:15
    
I don't see any technical reason why the compiler couldn't catch this. –  Brian R. Bondy Sep 19 '08 at 4:16
7  
In the general case can't catch it since the flow from the ctor can go anywhere and anywhere can call the pure virtual function. This is Halting problem 101. –  shoosh Sep 19 '08 at 4:20
3  
Answer is slightly wrong: a pure virtual function may still be defined, see Wikipedia for details. Correct phrasing: might not exist –  MSalters Sep 19 '08 at 10:46
1  
This can be triggered with MSVC if you add an extra level of indirection: have Base::Base call a non-virtual f() which in turn calls the (pure) virtual doIt method. –  Frerich Raabe Mar 5 at 14:20

As well as the standard case of calling a virtual function from the constructor or destructor of an object with pure virtual functions you can also get a pure virtual function call (on MSVC at least) if you call a virtual function after the object has been destroyed. Obviously this is a pretty bad thing to try and do but if you're working with abstract classes as interfaces and you mess up then it's something that you might see. It's possibly more likely if you're using referenced counted interfaces and you have a ref count bug or if you have an object use/object destruction race condition in a multi-threaded program... The thing about these kinds of purecall is that it's often less easy to fathom out what's going on as a check for the 'usual suspects' of virtual calls in ctor and dtor will come up clean.

To help with debugging these kinds of problems you can, in various versions of MSVC, replace the runtime library's purecall handler. You do this by providing your own function with this signature:

int __cdecl _purecall(void)

and linking it before you link the runtime library. This gives YOU control of what happens when a purecall is detected. Once you have control you can do something more useful than the standard handler. I have a handler that can provide a stack trace of where the purecall happened; see here: http://www.lenholgate.com/blog/2006/01/purecall.html for more details.

(Note you can also call _set_purecall_handler() to install your handler in some versions of MSVC).

share|improve this answer

Here is a great explanation of what can cause this:

http://www.artima.com/cppsource/pure_virtual.html

share|improve this answer

Usually when you call a virtual function through a dangling pointer--most likely the instance has already been destroyed.

There can be more "creative" reasons, too: maybe you've managed to slice off the part of your object where the virtual function was implemented. But usually it's just that the instance has already been destroyed.

share|improve this answer

Here is a sneaky way for it to happen. I had this essentially happen to me today.

class A
{
  A *pThis;
  public:
  A()
   : pThis(this)
  {
  }

  void callFoo()
  {
    pThis->foo(); // call through the pThis ptr which was initialized in the constructor
  }

  virtual void foo() = 0;
};

class B : public A
{
public:
  virtual void foo()
  {
  }
};

B b();
b.callFoo();
share|improve this answer
1  
At least it can't be reproduced on my vc2008,the vptr does point to A's vtable when first initialized in A's contructor, but then when B is fully initialized, the vptr is changed to point to B's vtable, which is ok –  Baiyan Huang Mar 7 '10 at 2:45
    
coudnt reproduce it either with vs2010/12 –  makc Jan 6 '13 at 9:11

I'd guess there is a vtbl created for the abstract class for some internal reason (it might be needed for some sort of run time type info) and something goes wrong and a real object gets it. It's a bug. That alone should say that something that can't happen is.

Pure speculation

edit: looks like I'm wrong in the case in question. OTOH IIRC some languages do allow vtbl calls out of the constructor destructor.

share|improve this answer
    
It is not a bug in the compiler, if that is what you mean. –  Thomas Sep 19 '08 at 4:20
    
Your suspicion is right - C# and Java allow this. In those languages, bohjects under construction do have their final type. In C++, objects change type during construction and that's why and when you can have objects with an abstract type. –  MSalters Sep 19 '08 at 10:42
    
ALL abstract classes, and real objects created derived from them, need a vtbl (virtual function table), listing which virtual functions should be called on it. In C++ an object is responsible for creating its own members, including the virtual function table. Constructors are called from base class to derived, and destructors are called from derived to base class, so in an abstract base class the virtual function table is not yet available. –  fuzzyTew Jul 17 '09 at 11:00

I use VS2010 and whenever I try calling destructor directly from public method, I get a "pure virtual function call" error during runtime.

template <typename T>
class Foo {
public:
  Foo<T>() {};
  ~Foo<T>() {};

public:
  void SomeMethod1() { this->~Foo(); }; /* ERROR */
};

So I moved what's inside ~Foo() to separate private method, then it worked like a charm.

template <typename T>
class Foo {
public:
  Foo<T>() {};
  ~Foo<T>() {};

public:
  void _MethodThatDestructs() {};
  void SomeMethod1() { this->_MethodThatDestructs(); }; /* OK */
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.