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Operating System Used:Ubuntu 11.04
Compiler Used: GCC

Program related files:Git Hub Link

I'm trying a implement program which will do a job, same as that of CPP (The C preprocessor) when I compile a .c file.

In this particular code Copy_file_to_buf function not copying the whole file into the buffer. Acutal size of the is 117406C,but ftell in the copy_file_to_buf function showing it as 114689.

EDIT: There is no data loss when I copied the contents of dummyfile to a buffer using same program but I've written copy_file_to_buf program seperately in temp.c file.

temp.c

#include<stdio.h>
main(int argc,char **argv)
{
    FILE *inputFile;
    int sizeofFile, rc;
    char *source_buf;
    fprintf(stderr, "In Copy_file_to_buf\n");
    sleep(1);

    inputFile=fopen(argv[1],"r");
    if (!inputFile) {
         fprintf(stderr, "Oops, failed to open inputfile \"%s\"\n", argv[1] );
         return NULL;
         }

    fseek(inputFile,0,SEEK_END);
    sizeofFile=ftell(inputFile);

    fseek(inputFile,0,SEEK_SET);
    source_buf=calloc(1,1+sizeofFile);
    rc = fread(source_buf,sizeofFile,1,inputFile);
    /* now check rc */
    fprintf(stderr, "Size of the file=%d; fread returned %d.\n", sizeofFile, rc);
    //sleep(5);
    fclose(inputFile);
    source_buf[sizeofFile] = 0;
    puts(source_buf);
    return source_buf;
}

Looks like the fseek() and ftell aren't working as expected for the below code.

puts("Copying dummyfile contents");
test_buf=Copy_file_to_buf("dummyfile");
puts(test_buf);

Filename: preprocessor.c

#include"myheader.h"

/*   agrv[1]=preprocessor
*    argv[2]=test.c
*
*   Program on PREPROCESSOR
*
*   Steps:
* 1.Removal of comments.
* 2.Inclusion of headerfiles.
* 3.Macro substitution.
*     a.function like arguments
*     b.Stringification
*     c.Concatenation
* 4.Conditional compilation
*     a.#Ifdef
*     b.#If
*     c.#defined
*     d.#Else
*     e.#Elif

*/


int
main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   char *source_buf,*subBuf,*rmc_buf,*test_buf;
   char **main_header_names,**sub_header_names;
   int main_header_count,sub_header_count;

    source_buf=(char *)Copy_file_to_buf(argv[1]);//...
    rmc_buf=removeComments(source_buf);//...
    main_header_names=(char **)getMainHeaderNames(rmc_buf);//...
    source_buf=(char *)Copy_file_to_buf(argv[1]);//...
    rmc_buf=removeComments(source_buf);//...
    main_header_count=mainHeaderCounter(rmc_buf);//...
    printf("Main Header Count=%d",main_header_count);//...
    includeHeaders(main_header_names,main_header_count);

    subBuf=(char *)Copy_file_to_buf("pre.i");//...
    sub_header_names=(char **)getSubHeadersNames(subBuf);//...

    subBuf=(char *)Copy_file_to_buf("pre.i");//...
    sub_header_count=subHeadersCounter(subBuf);//...

    WriteSubHeadersToFile(sub_header_count,sub_header_names,"dummyfile");//...

    puts("Copying dummyfile contents");

    test_buf=Copy_file_to_buf("dummyfile");
    puts(test_buf);

    /*test_buf=removeComments(test_buf);
    puts(test_buf);
    sub_header_names=(char **)getSubHeadersNames(test_buf);
    test_buf=(char *)Copy_file_to_buf("dummyfile");
    sub_header_count=subHeadersCounter(test_buf);

    WriteSubHeadersToFile(sub_header_count,sub_header_names,"dummyfile2");
    printf("Line:%d   File:%s",__LINE__,__FILE__);
    */

return 0;
}

Filename:CopyFile.c

#include"myheader.h"

//Copying input file data into source_buf

char * Copy_file_to_buf(char *fileName)
{
    FILE *inputFile;
    int sizeofFile;
    char *source_buf;
    puts("In Copy_file_to_buf");

    inputFile=fopen(fileName,"r");
    fseek(inputFile,0,2);
    sizeofFile=ftell(inputFile);
    sizeofFile++;
    fseek(inputFile,0,0);
    source_buf=calloc(1,sizeofFile);  
    fread(source_buf,sizeofFile,1,inputFile);
    printf("SIZE OF THE FILE=%d",sizeofFile);
    //sleep(5);
    fclose(inputFile);

    return source_buf;
}
share|improve this question
1  
If you happen to be on a Microsoft platform, fopen(fileName,"rb"); may be needed. –  wildplasser Mar 31 '12 at 12:13
    
@wildplasser I've compiled above code on Unbuntu 11.04. I did try fopen(fileName,"rb"); ,but the results were same. –  SlashQB Mar 31 '12 at 12:16
    
Please, use the predefined macros (SEEK_SET, SEEK_CUR, or SEEK_END) instead of magic constants. –  pmg Mar 31 '12 at 12:21
    
Have you inspected the content of source_buf to see if the entire text is present? Line-end translations may mean a difference between file-size and data copies to source_buf –  Clifford Mar 31 '12 at 12:28
    
@Clifford Yes I did. Last 30-40 lines were missing in the 'source_buf'. –  SlashQB Mar 31 '12 at 12:32

4 Answers 4

Check the return value of fseek() (and all other library calls!)

if (fseek(inputFile, 0, SEEK_END)) perror("seek to end");
sizeofFile = ftell(inputFile);
if (sizeofFile == -1) perror("ftell");
share|improve this answer

You are asking fread to read one block sizeofFile long. If it cannot read a block that size it will fail and return zero. Instead you would do better to request sizeofFile blocks of 1 byte long. Then it will report exactly how may bytes it managed to read, which may be fewer than sizeofFile for a number of reasons.

rc = fread( source_buf, 1, sizeofFile inputFile ) ;

In your case it will always be fewer than sizeofFile because you previously incremented it, so there never were sizeofFile bytes to be read. You should have read the file size not the buffer size, but the reading multiple blocks of one byte is still preferable in any case. In fact I would suggest the following changes:

sizeofFile = ftell( inputFile ) ;
// REMOVED sizeofFile++ ;
fseek( inputFile, 0, SEEK_SET ) ;
source_buf = calloc( 1, sizeofFile + 1 ) ;       // Don't confuse file size and buffer size here. 
rc = fread( source_buf, 1, sizeofFile, inputFile ) ;  // SWAPPED param 2 and 3

It makes sense to use a block size other than 1 if you are reading fixed length records. If reading a byte stream of arbitrary length, the size should generally be 1, and the count used to determine the amount of data read.

share|improve this answer
char * Copy_file_to_buf(char *fileName)
{
    FILE *inputFile;
    int sizeofFile, rc;
    char *source_buf;
    fprintf(stderr, "In Copy_file_to_buf\n");

    inputFile=fopen(fileName,"r");
    if (!inputFile) {
         fprintf(stderr, "Oops, failed to open inputfile \"%s\"\n", fileName );
         return NULL;
         }

    fseek(inputFile,0,SEEK_END);
    sizeofFile=ftell(inputFile);

    fseek(inputFile,0,SEEK_SET);
    source_buf=calloc(1,1+sizeofFile);
    rc = fread(source_buf,sizeofFile,1,inputFile);
    /* now check rc */
    fprintf(stderr, "SIZE OF THE FILE=%d; fread returned %d.\n", sizeofFile, rc);
    //sleep(5);
    fclose(inputFile);
    source_buf[sizeofFile] = 0;
    return source_buf;
}

UPDATE: for testing added main + includes...

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main (int argc, char **argv)

{
char *lutser;

lutser = Copy_file_to_buf(argv[1] );

fprintf (stderr, "Strlen(lutser)=%u\n",  (unsigned) strlen(lutser) );

puts (lutser);
return 0;
}

Output:

-rw-r--r-- 1 Plasser pis  1008 2012-03-31 15:10 lutsbuf.c
-rwxr-xr-x 1 Plasser pis  8877 2012-03-31 15:11 a.out
Plasser@Pisbak$ ./a.out lutsbuf.c
In Copy_file_to_buf
SIZE OF THE FILE=1008; fread returned 1.
Strlen(lutser)=1008

... 
<contents of file>
...
share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting rc equal to 0. –  SlashQB Mar 31 '12 at 12:30
    
Look it up in the manual. What does it mean? You are trying to read N+1 bytes from an N sized file. Please reread my answer carefully. –  wildplasser Mar 31 '12 at 12:36
    
I'm getting the vale of rc as 1. Console Output: SIZE OF THE FILE=114688; fread returned 1. –  SlashQB Mar 31 '12 at 12:48
    
Well, that sounds better. Did you notice that I removed the sizeofFile++; line, and changed the calloc to 1+sizeofFile ? –  wildplasser Mar 31 '12 at 12:50
    
Credit where credit is due; it was @SlashQB first comment to this that led to my answer. +1 –  Clifford Mar 31 '12 at 12:58

CopyNewFile doesn't close its file. WriteSubHeadersToFile may not always (hard to follow the flow). How are you determining the "real" size of the file?

share|improve this answer
    
I've found the 'real' size by opening the file i.e 'dummyfile' with vi editor. –  SlashQB Mar 31 '12 at 12:29

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