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i'm trying to do some "post"/"lazy" evaluation of arguments on my strings. Suppose i've this:

s = "SELECT * FROM {table_name} WHERE {condition}" 

I'd like to return the string with the {table_name} replaced, but not the {condition}, so, something like this:

s1 = s.format(table_name = "users")

So, I can build the hole string later, like:

final = s1.format(condition= "user.id = {id}".format(id=2))

The result should be, of course:

"SELECT * FROM users WHERE user.id = 2" 

I've found this previous answer, this is exactly what I need, but i'd like to use the format string function.

python, format string Thank you for your help!

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1  
Naturally, you're going to escape all the replacement strings to prevent an SQL injection attack - right? ;) –  Li-aung Yip Mar 31 '12 at 12:42
1  
I hope you're not ever letting any user input get into this? This sort of code is asking for security holes. –  Chris Morgan Mar 31 '12 at 12:42
    
Of course i won't do it fellas, maybe it wasn't the best example, but was what first came to my mind. –  santiagobasulto Mar 31 '12 at 12:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't use the format function because it will raise a KeyError.

string.Template supports safe substituion:

from string import Template
s = Template('SELECT * FROM $table_name WHERE $condition')
s.safe_substitute(table_name='users')

'SELECT * FROM users WHERE $condition'

If you use plain variable names (no format specifiers, no indexing, etc..) this will also work (thanks @Simeon Visser for the idea):

def myformat(s, *args, **kwargs):
  while True:
    try:
      return s.format(*args, **kwargs)
    except KeyError as e:
      e=e.args[0]
      kwargs[e] = "{%s}" % e

s = "SELECT * FROM {table_name} WHERE {condition}" 
myformat(s, table_name="users")

'SELECT * FROM users WHERE {condition}'
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You can replace the condition with itself:

s.format(table_name='users', condition='{condition}')

which gives us:

SELECT * FROM users WHERE {condition}

You can use this string later to fill in the condition.

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Wow, this is so easy. I'd never think this work. –  santiagobasulto Mar 31 '12 at 12:32
    
replacing something with itself doesnt seem very Pythonic at least from my understanding... –  jamylak Mar 31 '12 at 12:43
    
Well, it's short, clear and it works so that's Pythonic to me :) –  Simeon Visser Mar 31 '12 at 12:47

This builds on @Karoly Horvath's answer to add support for index keys and attribute access on named keys:

import re

def my_format(template, *args, **kwargs):
  next_index = len(args)
  while True:
    try:
      return template.format(*args, **kwargs)
    except KeyError as e:
      key = e.args[0]
      finder = '\{' + key + '.*?\}'
      template = re.sub(finder, '{\g<0>}', template)
    except IndexError as e:
      args = args + ('{' + str(next_index) + '}',)
      next_index += 1

So to test it out:

class MyObj:
  bar = 'baz'

  def __repr__(self):
    return '<MyObj instance>'

my_obj = MyObj()

template = '{0}, {1}, {foo}, {foo.bar}, {0}, {10}, {missing}'
print my_format(template)
print my_format(template, '1st', '2nd', missing='Not Missing')
print my_format(template, foo=my_obj)

Output:

{0}, {1}, {foo}, {foo.bar}, {0}, {10}, {missing}
1st, 2nd, {foo}, {foo.bar}, 1st, {10}, Not Missing
{0}, {1}, <MyObj instance>, baz, {0}, {10}, {missing}
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This is a slight change to @ShawnFumo's answer which has a small bug. We need to add a word boundary check (the \b in the regular expression) to ensure that we are matching only the failing key and another key that starts with the same string. This prevents a missing {foo} key from also treating {food} and {foolish} as if they were missing.

import re

def my_format(template, *args, **kwargs):
  next_index = len(args)
  while True:
    try:
      return template.format(*args, **kwargs)
    except KeyError as e:
      key = e.args[0]
      finder = r'\{' + key + r'\b.*?\}'
      template = re.sub(finder, r'{\g<0>}', template)
    except IndexError as e:
      args = args + ('{' + str(next_index) + '}',)
      next_index += 1

So to test it out:

class MyObj:
  bar = 'baz'

  def __repr__(self):
    return '<MyObj instance>'

my_obj = MyObj()

template = '{0}, {1}, {foo}, {foo.bar}, {0}, {10}, {missing}'
print my_format(template)
print my_format(template, '1st', '2nd', missing='Not Missing')
print my_format(template, foo=my_obj)

print

template2 = '{foo} and {food}'
print my_format(template2)
print my_format(template2, food='burger')
print my_format(template2, foo=my_obj, food='burger')

Output:

{0}, {1}, {foo}, {foo.bar}, {0}, {10}, {missing}
1st, 2nd, {foo}, {foo.bar}, 1st, {10}, Not Missing
{0}, {1}, <MyObj instance>, baz, {0}, {10}, {missing}

{foo} and {food}
{foo} and burger
repr(<MyObj instance>) and burger
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