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I'm using some not optimal code written by me... :-|

I have following code:

string fmtLine = "";
            string[] splitedFmtLine;
            int counterFMTlines = 0;

            foreach (string fmtF in fmtFiles)
            {
                using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(fmtF))
                {
                    while ((fmtLine = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(counterFMTlines++);
                        foreach (L3Message message in rez)
                        {
                            splitedFmtLine = Regex.Split(fmtLine, "\t");

                            if (message.Time == splitedFmtLine[0])
                            {
                                message.ScramblingCode = splitedFmtLine[7];      
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

I tested this code when List was empty and there was only one file (tab delimited, 280000 lines), and even then it took lifetime (1 min) to go through all 280000 lines of my file. That means that execution skipped foreach loop where is my List of myObjs.

I cannot understand why it took so long?

As example, I was filling my List of myObjs (tree hierarchy) with different text file (source file) but bigger than this tab delimited(tab delimited: 16MB, source file: 36MB) and it took only second versus this 1 minute.

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Did you try sr.ReadAllLines? –  chiffre Mar 31 '12 at 12:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Apart from the problem writing to the console, you also have a O(m*n) runtime for n being the number of lines in the file and m being the number of messages. This is bad if m or n is big. You can reduce this to an O(n) operation by using a Dictionary instead and eliminating the inner loop.

You can put your messages in a Dictionary, using the Time as a key. In the loop you only have to ask the dictionary for the messages at a specific time:

        string fmtLine = "";
        string[] splitedFmtLine;
        int counterFMTlines = 0;

        var messageTimes = new Dictionary<string, LinkedList<L3Message>>();
        foreach (L3Message message in rez)
        {
            LinkedList<L3Message> list=null;
            messageTimes.TryGetValue(message.Time, out list);

            list = list ?? new LinkedList<L3Message>();

            list.AddLast(message);
            messageTimes[message.Time] = list;
        }

        foreach (string fmtF in fmtFiles)
        {
            using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(fmtF))
            {
                while ((fmtLine = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
                {
                    //Console.WriteLine(counterFMTlines++);
                    splitedFmtLine = fmtLine.Split('\t');

                    LinkedList<L3Message> messageList = null;
                    messageTimes.TryGetValue(splitedFmtLine[0], out messageList);

                    if(messageList != null)
                    {
                        foreach (var message in messageList)
                        {
                            message.ScramblingCode = splitedFmtLine[7];                                
                        }
                        messageTimes.Remove(splitedFmtLine[0]); //see comments
                    }

                    if(messageTimes.Count==0) break; //see comments
                }
            }
            if(messageTimes.Count==0) break; //see comments
        } 

This should be super fast.

Edit: I changed the example so that it supports cases where there is more than one message for one time.

Edit2: I added an optimization based on the fact that message time and ScramblingCode always correlate (see comments).

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This looks great... I'll tested when my VS profiler is finished. –  JohnDoeKazama Mar 31 '12 at 13:03
    
Thx for edit... Here is catch, in FMTfile, there is multiple lines with same time, but I need only one (for same time ScramblingCode is same). Do u think that here is some possible optimisation? –  JohnDoeKazama Mar 31 '12 at 13:12
    
Can there be more than one message with the same time where you have to set the scrambling code? –  aKzenT Mar 31 '12 at 13:20
    
You could add a messageTimes.Remove(splitedFmtLine[0]) inside the if statement. Like this you wouldn't find any messages the next time a line is read with a time that is already updated. At the end of the foreach you can then check if messageTimes is empty and in this case break out of the loop completely (because all messages are updated already). –  aKzenT Mar 31 '12 at 13:23
    
Yes! There can be more messages with same time I'm filling my List<L3Message> depend of how many params are in source file, if in sourcefile(text file with tree hierarchy oriented lines) are one of params, than i created L3Message obj with that param and all his subparams (they are in tree hierarchy in file)... here is problem which i solved (tabdelimited output in that quest. is not my fmtFile, FMTfile here is second of input file creating my L3Message obj) stackoverflow.com/questions/9887506/… –  JohnDoeKazama Mar 31 '12 at 13:28

You are writing 280.000 times to the console which is very slow. Remove the console output. Also, use string.Split('\t') which is way faster than this particular regex call.

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As @usr said, get rid of console.write in the loop, move it to the first loop with files if you want to have some kind of information at runtime. –  cichy Mar 31 '12 at 12:46
    
thx for info, I know that Console out affect on performance, but i thought that Regex expressions are more optimal than string methods... –  JohnDoeKazama Mar 31 '12 at 12:58
    
No, Regex methods have a non-trivial amount of overhead. I have never seen a case where a manual string operation could not be made faster than a regex. Regex'es are convenience features. –  usr Mar 31 '12 at 13:01
    
Manual string operations tend to be more memory intensive though, because you create a lot of string, that you don't need (assuming you are doing multiple string operations). –  aKzenT Mar 31 '12 at 13:10
    
@aKzenT this can always be avoided. In the extreme case you are re-coding the regex'es state machine. If performance is important, you can always get on-par with regex and most of the time better. A regex is just a runtime-generated method which you can reproduce your self. You can even save a compiled regex to an assembly on disk. –  usr Mar 31 '12 at 13:12

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