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I have a code like this:

class PacketDAO{
    //...
    public void UpdatePacketStatus(Guid packetID, Status status)
    {
        using (var ctx = new DataContext())
        {
            var packet = ctx.Packet.SingleOrDefault(p => p.PacketID == packetID);
            packet.Status = status;
            ctx.SubmitChanges();
        }
    }

    public void UpdatePacketTime(Guid packetID, DateTime? time)
    {
        using (var ctx = new DataContext())
        {
            var packet = ctx.Packet.SingleOrDefault(p => p.PacketID == packetID);
            packet.Time = time;
            ctx.SubmitChanges();
        }
    }
    //...
}       

We can notice some boring repetition in the code.

So, it would be nice to write a generic method Update in a way we can afford ourselves to write something like this:

packet.Update<Guid, Packet>(guid, p => p.Time = DateTime.Now);
packet.Update<Guid, Packet>(guid, p => p.Status = Status.Ok);

Tell me, please, is it possible to write such a method?

Which book can I learn that from?

(I have found only one close example: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc981895.aspx, but it is not clear enough how to derive my Update method from that)

Thank you.

UPD.

Ok, Jon Skeet tells there's something wrong in the question, and I agree, that my calls should look different, I think these calls are possible:

packet.Update<Packet>(p => p.packetID == guid, p => p.Time = DateTime.Now);
packet.Update<Packet>(p => p.packetID == guid, p => p.Status = Status.Ok);
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Having a LINQ-like method that updates the data is a bit unnatural –  zerkms Mar 31 '12 at 12:46
1  
One book I'd recommend is Pro Linq. –  Jim Schubert Mar 31 '12 at 12:47
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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Lets start by writing an ordinary helper function. This has nothing to do with LINQ.

public static void UpdatePacket(Guid packetID, Action<Packet> update)
{
    using (var ctx = new DataContext())
    {
        var packet = ctx.Packet.SingleOrDefault(p => p.PacketID == packetID);
        update(packet);
        ctx.SubmitChanges();
    }
}

So you see, you can use the update-delegate to extract the only small piece of code which is different for each call. The rest is the same, and now we have it centralized and reusabe.

You can also make the method generic:

public static void UpdatePacket<TEntity>(Expression<Func<TEntity, bool>> filter, Action<TEntity> update)
{
    using (var ctx = new DataContext())
    {
        var e = ctx.GetTable<TEntity>().Single(filter);
        update(e);
        ctx.SubmitChanges();
    }
}

If you want to have the filter automated, you need to use the Expression and reflection API to construct the filter expression. The code for that is a little longer.

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4  
Notice, that we are not even using an extension-method. It is not needed here. Go simple when simple is enough. –  usr Mar 31 '12 at 12:57
2  
Rather than writing comments to your own answer, you can add the additional information directly to the answer by editing it :) –  Niklas B. Mar 31 '12 at 12:58
    
Yes, but if we need an update method for a single field of a table different from Packet, we will get the code repetition in somewhat higher layer of abstraction, as we write almost the same helper function with a signature say static void UpdateMessage(int messageId, Action<Message> update). –  gentlenub Mar 31 '12 at 16:44
    
I added a generic variant. –  usr Mar 31 '12 at 16:55
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