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I'm trying to write code that has a pointer point to a 2-dimensional array.

My main purpose is for not just one asd array, like I would like to point 5 array each of which is 2 dimensional.

int asd1[2][2];
int asd2[2][2];
int *se;
se[0] = asd1;
se[1] = asd2;
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1  
Have you googled "pass 2d array as parameter"? –  Luchian Grigore Mar 31 '12 at 13:13

4 Answers 4

Use se = asd[0];

The reason is that the symbol asd yields not a pointer to an int but rather a pointer to a one-dimensional array of ints.

@Mig's solution may be good, too. It depends on what you want. In my experience, it tends to work better when you treat a two-dimensional array of a basic type like int as though it were a one-dimensional of length n*n. (This is expecially true in numerical work, where you are likely to call BLAS and LAPACK, but may be true elsewhere, as well. You probably aren't doing numerical work here, but, well, try @Mig's and mine both, and see which you don't prefer. Good luck.)

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You can do this:

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int asd[2][2] = {{0,1},{2,3}};
    int (*se)[2]; // a pointer (*se) to an array (2-element array, but only you know it, not the compiler) of array-of-two-integers [2]
    se = asd;

    printf("%d %d\n%d %d\n", se[0][0], se[0][1], se[1][0], se[1][1]);

    return 0;
}

or:

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int asd[2][2] = {{0,1},{2,3}};
    int (*se)[2][2]; // a pointer (*se) to a 2-element array (first [2]) of two element array (second [2]) of ints
    se = &asd;

    printf("%d %d\n%d %d\n", (*se)[0][0], (*se)[0][1], (*se)[1][0], (*se)[1][1]);

    return 0;
}
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You want something like this:

int asd[2][2];
int (*se)[2] = asd;

This is equivalent to

int (*se)[2] = &asd[0];

because asd decays to a pointer to its first element in this context.

The key thing to bear in mind is that the type of asd[0] is int[2], not int*, so you need a pointer to an int[2] (i.e. int (*)[2]) and not a pointer to an int* (i.e. int**).

Incidentally, you can make an int* point to the first element of the asd[0] if you like:

int *p = &asd[0][0]; // or just = asd[0];, because it decays to &asd[0][0];

but accessing the other elements of the 2D array as if it were a 1D array, e.g. p[2], would be undefined behaviour.


As a more general point, it's often better to eschew using raw C-style arrays altogether if you can help it. You might want to investigate std::array or std::vector, depending on your needs.

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If you were allocating that array dynamically, you could do something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define SIZE 10

int main() {
  int i;
  int **asd;
  asd = (int **)malloc(sizeof(int *) * SIZE);
  for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
    asd[i] = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int) * SIZE);
  }

  int **se;
  se = asd;
  se[0][1] = 10;
  printf("%d %d\n", se[0][1], asd[0][1]);

  for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
    free(asd[i]);
  }
  free(asd);

  return 0;
}

EDIT: My first answer was wrong, here's what I had said:

You need a pointer to a pointer, since your array is 2-dimensional:

int asd[2][2];
int **se;
se = asd;

Now you should be able to:

se[0][1] = 10;
share|improve this answer
    
No. That'll not work. asd is [[int, int], [int, int]] no pointer just elements, and se[n][m] expects [int*, int*, …] pointers to 'sub'-arrays –  x539 Mar 31 '12 at 13:20
    
you can't equate se = asd, that was my problem –  user1305058 Mar 31 '12 at 13:25
    
@x539 You are right, thanks! I'll edit my answer. –  Mig Mar 31 '12 at 13:29
    
@Mig: The question's a C++ one - whilst you could use malloc and free, it's very C-style and retro. A more idiomatic C++ way would involve using std::vector (i.e. not even new and delete). –  Stuart Golodetz Mar 31 '12 at 13:41
1  
@StuartGolodetz: Ooops, forgot about the C++ tag. –  Mig Mar 31 '12 at 19:43

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