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I'm newbie in Python. I have this simple code

a = 0
b = 0
c = 0

while a <= 5:
    while b <=3:
        while c <= 8:
            print a , b , c
            c += 1
        b += 1
    a += 1

And work only while with C

0 0 0
0 0 1
0 0 2
0 0 3
0 0 4
0 0 5
0 0 6
0 0 7
0 0 8

Why? How to fix it? Thanks!

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4  
This is not how you supposed to write loops in python. Use for a in range(6). –  georg Mar 31 '12 at 13:37
    
@Ignacio Not sure that title makes any sense? –  agf Mar 31 '12 at 13:43
    
@agf: fixed it. –  Li-aung Yip Mar 31 '12 at 14:02
    
@agf: It only works the first time. After that, nothing. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 31 '12 at 15:08
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams That's the answer. The question was why only the 'c' loop was working (or appearing to work) -- the innermost loop. –  agf Mar 31 '12 at 16:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First way

Your way will work, but you have to remember to reset the loop counters on each iteration.

a = 0
b = 0
c = 0

while a <= 5:
    while b <=3:
        while c <= 8:
            print a , b , c
            c += 1
        b += 1
        c = 0 # reset
    a += 1
    b = 0 # reset
    c = 0 # reset

Second way (Pythonic)

The first way involves a lot of bookkeeping. In Python, the easier way to specify a loop over a range of numbers is to use a for loop over an xrange* iterator:

for a in xrange(5+1): # Note xrange(n) produces 0,1,2...(n-1) and does not include n.
    for b in xrange (3+1):
        for c in xrange (8+1):
            print a,b,c
  • Note: In Python 3, xrange is now called range. (Or more precisely, Python 3 range replaces Python 2.x's range and xrange.)

Third way (best)

The second way can be simplified by application of itertools.product(), which takes in a number of iterables (lists) and returns every possible combination of each element from each list.

import itertools
for a,b,c in itertools.product(xrange(5+1),xrange(3+1),xrange(8+1)):
    print a,b,c

For these tricks and more, read Dan Goodger's "Code Like a Pythonista: Idiomatic Python".

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It's worth noting that xrange() is a builtin pre-Python 3.x, after that, just use range(). Although, due to the print syntax used, it's clear the OP is using Python 2.x, it's still a good idea to mention for others. –  Lattyware Mar 31 '12 at 13:42
    
@Lattyware: True. I will let your comment serve as the notice to Py3k users. ;) –  Li-aung Yip Mar 31 '12 at 13:43
    
The third way is the Pythonic too! :D Hehehe im just messing with you... –  jamylak Mar 31 '12 at 13:43
2  
It's always the nitpicking with you people, isn't it?! :) (Edited as noted.) –  Li-aung Yip Mar 31 '12 at 13:49
1  
No need to reset c twice (in your first solution). –  Tim Pietzcker Mar 31 '12 at 14:08

You forgot to reset b and c at the top of the loops for a and b respectively. This is why we use for loops instead.

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whe while c <= 8 gets looped while c <= 8 so c gets to 8 and therefore the program never has to execute that loop again.

Try setting c = 0 at the end of the loop, as well as setting b and a to 0 after their loops or better yet make use of itertools or for loops.

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After the first while loop c will equal 9. You never reset c so, c <= 8 will never be true on the a or b loops.

If you reset each of them before their loops, it will work correctly.

a = 0
while a <= 5:
    b = 0
    while b <=3:
        c = 0
        while c <= 8:
            print a , b , c
            c += 1
        b += 1
    a += 1
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