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I have this form:-

    <form action="">
    <table border="0">
        <td colspan="2" class="instruction">Select your desired option to search.</td>
    </table>
      <table>
        <tr>
          <td><label>
            <input onClick="generatenew();" type="radio" name="search_option" value="code" id="search_option_0">
            Customer Code</label></td>
          <td><label>
            <input type="radio" name="search_option" value="company" id="search_option_1">
            Customer Company</label></td>
          <td><label>
            <input type="radio" name="search_option" value="name" id="search_option_2">
            Customer Name</label></td>
          <td><label>
            <input type="radio" name="search_option" value="email" id="search_option_3">
            Customer Email</label></td>
        </tr>
      </table>
      <input class="Button" name="search_submit" type="submit" value="Search">
    </form>

Now after the last </table> i want to create a textbox on selection of anyone of the option button. Means, dynamically without page load.

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1  
Valid HTML does not allows you to put input element right after </tr>, you need to place it after </table> –  rkosegi Mar 31 '12 at 14:18
    
k so how i can create a textbox after </table> –  Django Anonymous Mar 31 '12 at 14:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Javascript alone:

// Create the element
var input = document.createElement("input");
input.type = 'text';
input.name = 'inputName';
input.value = 'some value';
input.size = 10;
input.maxLength = 10;
input.className = 'someClass';

// append the element
var btn = document.getElementsByName('search_submit')[0]; // get the button to insert the element before it;
btn.parentElement.insertBefore(input, btn);

Same process with jQuery:

$('input[name="search_submit"]').before('<input type="text" name="inputName" size="10" maxlength="10" class="someClass" />');

jsfiddle here

Here is the jsfiddle for the click on the radios, with a check to generate only once.

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can you please demonstrate it to me on jsfiddle.net –  Django Anonymous Mar 31 '12 at 14:48
    
Sure, but this is a working example. –  rcdmk Mar 31 '12 at 14:49
    
@KooiInc pay attention to my code pal. I'm inserting the element right after the </table>, before the submit button. –  rcdmk Mar 31 '12 at 15:01
    
Thanks a lot, i need one more help, the textbox should appear on the click event of option button itself. And if a person selects different option then still there should be only one textbox. I mean to say that there has to be only one textbox displayed when anyone of them get selected, and if again another one get selected only one textbox should only appear. You can do one thing, only on selection of anyone of them a textbox should appear... Something like onclick="showInputBox() If you can extend your support, it would be a great support to me. Thanks –  Django Anonymous Mar 31 '12 at 15:10
1  
You can attach this to the click of the radios and, in the beggining of the function you check if the element already exists. I'll make another fiddle to demostrate in a minute. –  rcdmk Mar 31 '12 at 15:12

with standard javascript you will have to create another div box after the and then set it's innerHtml with the input element html that you want.

with jQuery you have special functions like .after or .append which carries similar tasks.

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I would also recommend you jQuery ( http://jquery.com/ ), but you can also browse this article, it might help you understand the problem .. http://www.javascriptkit.com/javatutors/dom2.shtml

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But i heard that AJAX is capable of doing it. Do I am wrong? –  Django Anonymous Mar 31 '12 at 14:33
1  
Well you said you want it without a page load. That's what javascript does (and jQuery). Ajax is for communication of javascript and server. You asked about adding new element to the DOM. That is something that is happening on the client side. –  Oriesok Vlassky Mar 31 '12 at 14:36
    
@AbhilashShukla With AJAX you can call an URL and load his output into a variable and insert in the document. –  rcdmk Mar 31 '12 at 14:45
            <html>
            <body>
            <table border=2>
            <tr>
            <td>PASSWORD</td>
            <td><input type="radio" name="radGroup" id="rad1" onchange="showElement('1')">
            DEFAULT PASSWORD
            <input type="radio" name="radGroup" id="rad1" onchange="showElement('2')">
            NEW PWD</td></tr>
            <tr><td></td><td>
            <span id="elementNum1" style="display:none;cisibility:hidden;">
            <input type="text" id="txt1" value="jct123" /> your default 
            </span>
            <span id="elementNum2" style="display:none;cisibility:hidden;">
            <input type="text" id="txt2" value="" />conform
            </span>
            </td>
            </tr>
            <script type="text/javascript">
            function showElement(iElementToShow) 
            {       
            var oPage;
            var bContinueLooping=true;
            var iElement=1;
            while (bContinueLooping) 
            {
                try 
                {
                    oPage=document.getElementById('elementNum'+iElement);
                    oPage.style.display='none';
                    oPage.style.visibility='hidden';
                    iElement++;
                } 
                catch(oError) 
                {
                    bContinueLooping=false;
                }
            }
            oPage=document.getElementById('elementNum'+iElementToShow);
            oPage.style.visibility='visible';
            oPage.style.display='inline';
            }
            </script>
            </table>
            </body>
            </html>
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Welcome to Stack Overflow! This answer turned up in the low quality review queue, presumably because you didn't explain some of the contents. If you do explain this (in your answer), you are far more likely to get more upvotes—and the questioner actually learns something! –  The Guy with The Hat May 6 at 11:04

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