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The JavaScript code is as follows:

   <script>
    a={name:"abc"};
    b={xyz:"123"};
    this.c='aaa';
    this.cc='bbb';
    d=new Date();
    var e=new Array();
    var f=false;
    this.g=123;
    this.g++;
    document.write(b.xyz+this.cc);
    </script>

Only the variables b(b={xyz:"123"};) and cc(this.cc='bbb';) are used above.

Does anyone know if there is a way to delete unused variables with Python or Lisp?

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This is a pretty complex thing - I'm pretty sure you'd have to actually parse the JavaScript to work it out. I'd recommend looking into an open source IDE - most IDEs provide highlighting for issues like this - and see how they do it. –  Lattyware Mar 31 '12 at 16:17
    
if you need to do it in new work, You can use condition by server side scripting. but, if you want to do it in the already existed code and the script size is big, it's hard to do.! –  Sakthi Mar 31 '12 at 16:27
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3 Answers

Try the closure compiler to remove redundant code and useless whitespaces from javascript code: I ran your code(158 bytes) on closure compiler and I got this(89 bytes):

a={name:"abc"};b={b:"123"};this.a="bbb";d=new Date;document.write(b.b+this.a);

http://closure-compiler.appspot.com

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I think only the advanced option will remove unreachable code, so make sure it is checked more info here –  ajax333221 Mar 31 '12 at 17:16
1  
Google uses (and made?) this compiler; hard to think there's a better solution out there for this problem. –  Clayton Stanley Apr 1 '12 at 2:28
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In Common Lisp land there's parse-js to parse JavaScript code. There's also CL-JavaScript interpreter, built on top of it, if you want to interactively evaluate JavaScript code and perform some kind of dynamic analysis. As for static analysis, there's cl-uglify-js, also built on top of parse-js - either it does dead code elimination, or you can try to modify it to do that...

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Quick and dirty text based hack in TXR:

script.txr:

@(collect)
@prolog
@(last)
<script>
@(end)
@(collect :vars (code))
@  (block occurs)
@    (cases)
@{decl /(var )?/}@{var /[a-z]+/}=@expr
@      (trailer)
@      (skip)
@      (cases)
@        (skip)@var@(skip)
@        (bind code `@decl@var=@expr`)
@      (or)
</script>
@        (fail occurs)
@      (end)
@    (or)
@code
@    (end)
@  (end)
@(last)
</script>
@(end)
@(collect)
@epilog
@(end)
@(output)
@{prolog "\n"}
<script>
@{code "\n"}
</script>
@{epilog "\n"}
@(end)

Test case script.html:

verbatim
text
<script>
a={name:"abc"};
b={xyz:"123"};
this.c='aaa';
this.cc='bbb';
d=new Date();
var e=new Array();
var f=false;
this.g=123;
this.g++;
</script>
left
alone

Run:

$ txr script.txr script.html
verbatim
text
<script>
a={name:"abc"};
b={xyz:"123"};
this.c='aaa';
this.cc='bbb';
var e=new Array();
this.g=123;
this.g++;
</script>
left
alone

As you can see, some condensing was achieved.

Howver, the code thinks that aaa constitutes a use of the variable a. The variable e is retained because e occurs in var f=false; but you don't see that any more because that line itself is deleted since f does not occur.

If you want more than dumb text based hacks, you have to parse the Javascript. (Possible in a clear and disciplined grammar-based way in TXR also, but coding all the grammar rules is tedious.)

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